hēja & cī

hēja

This is a deontic modal marker that modifies the third clause of the KÄ“len rephrasal of the 1st article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It usually translates as ‘should’, and indicates an admonishment to be as described in the third clause.

cī

Is a commissive mood marker and commits the speaker (which in this context is the 1st person paucal/collective encompassing everyone) to do as described in the third clause. Since the 4th clause is subordinate to the third, it is included in this as well.

Confused yet? These two operate together to put a mild imperative and a should into the third clause, like so:

tō jāo hēja senneñ anēla anciēri ke mān mo mīþa
therefore should we to each other personhood courtesies from one to other
therefore we should give to each other the courtesies of personhood
ien sexe mo maþūskīri mo sāim maþūskīriēma cī
that to them to weft-kin to them their weft-kin must
that are given to weft-kin and to their weft-kin

And that concludes the KÄ“len rephrasal of the 1st article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Our progress:
tō la mēli manaren tēna ñe anhēnārīki anīλi jañāona jañēie
‘Because each person is an equal thread in the cloth of society…’
tō pa ñēim tēna ē lenārre ē lewēren
‘Because we each of us have soul and identity…’
tō jāo hēja senneñ anēla anciēri ke mān mo mīþa
‘Therefore we should give to each other the courtesies of personhood’
ien sexe mo maþūskīri mo sāim maþūskīriēma cī;
‘That are given to weft-kin and to their weft-kin.’

Tomorrow, more emotions.

anān & anīþa

anaan

anān

one, the one.

aniitha

anīþa

other, the other.

These occur together in the third clause of the KÄ“len rephrasal of the 1st article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The expression, in full, is ke mān mo mīþa. ke is the particle used with SE to indicate an animate source and mo is used with SE to indicate a beneficiary. The relational SE in this clause is inflected with -enneñ, which is a 1st person paucal reflexive form. So ke mān mo mīþa expands on that as ‘from one to the other’ and is a formal way to say ‘one another’. And the clause senneñ anÄ“la anciÄ“ri ke mān mo mīþa thus means ‘we give to one another the courtesies of personhood’.

That completes almost all of the third clause, which will be completed tomorrow. The fourth clause is subordinate to the third clause, and starts with the particle ien, which is used with SE to rename or elaborate on the object of SE. In the third clause the object of SE is anÄ“la anciÄ“ri, those ‘courtesies of personhood’, so the fourth clause describes those. The description is straightforward in that I’ve already discussed maþūskÄ«ri, which means ‘weft-kin’. In this context, distant kin might also be a good translation. So, mo maþūskÄ«ri ‘to weft-kin’ and mo sāim maþūskÄ«riÄ“ma ‘to their weft-kin’. SE in the subordinate fourth clause is correspondingly inflected for 3rd person plural, referring to both of these groups. So, senneñ anÄ“la anciÄ“ri ke mān mo mīþa ien sexe mo maþūskÄ«rimo sāim maþūskÄ«riÄ“ma ‘We give to one another the courtesies of personhood that are given to weft-kin and to their weft-kin.’

Our progress:
tō la mēli manaren tēna ñe anhēnārīki anīλi jañāona jañēie
‘Because each person is an equal thread in the cloth of society…’
tō pa ñēim tēna ē lenārre ē lewēren
‘Because we each of us have soul and identity…’
tō jāo hēja senneñ anēla anciēri ke mān mo mīþa
ien sexe mo maþūskīri mo sāim maþūskīriēma cī;

anciēri

ancieeri

anciēri

courtesies, polite phrases and behaviors, and respect for another’s point of view. In other words, the right and proper way (anhÄ“nār) to treat other people because they are people.

This is the fifth word in the third clause of the KÄ“len rephrasal of the 1st article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It sits next to the word anÄ“la which is the stative form of mÄ“la and thus means ‘personhood’.

Our progress:
tō la mēli manaren tēna ñe anhēnārīki anīλi jañāona jañēie
‘Because each person is an equal thread in the cloth of society…’
tō pa ñēim tēna ē lenārre ē lewēren
‘Because we each of us have soul and identity…’
tō jāo hēja senneñ anēla anciēri ke mān mo mīþa
ien sexe mo maþūskīri mo sāim maþūskīriēma cī;

Ä“ … Ä“

ee ee

Ä“ … Ä“

This is another coordinating conjunction and means simply ‘and’. This also allows us to complete the second clause of the KÄ“len rephrasal of the 1st article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Wait, you say, what about lenārre and lewēren. Those are simply the first person possessed forms of senārre and sewēren, which I already discussed when covering body parts.

The second clause:

tō pa ñēim tēna ē lenārre ē lewēren
because PA we each and soul and identity
Because we each of us have soul and identity…

Our progress:
tō la mēli manaren tēna ñe anhēnārīki anīλi jañāona jañēie
‘Because each person is an equal thread in the cloth of society…’
tō pa ñēim tēna ē lenārre ē lewēren
‘Because we each of us have soul and identity…’
tō jāo hēja senneñ anēla anciēri ke mān mo mīþa
ien sexe mo maþūskīri mo sāim maþūskīriēma cī;

anñēie

annjeeie

anñēie

equal in value or equivalent.

This is the last word in the first clause of the KÄ“len rephrasal of the 1st article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which means we can now look at the clause as a whole and translate it:

tō la mēli manaren tēna ñe anhēnārīki anīλi jañāona jañēie
because LA person every each = society cloth thread equal
‘Because each person is an equal thread in the cloth of society…’

Our progress:
tō la mēli manaren tēna ñe anhēnārīki anīλi jañāona jañēie
‘Because each person is an equal thread in the cloth of society…’
tō pa ñēim tēna ē lenārre ē lewēren
tō jāo hēja senneñ anēla anciēri ke mān mo mīþa
ien sexe mo maþūskīri mo sāim maþūskīriēma cī;

jañāona

janjaaona

jañāona

a piece of thread or string.

This goes with yesterday’s word in the KÄ“len rephrasal of the 1st article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and furthers the metaphor of society as cloth.

Our progress:
tō la mēli manaren tēna ñe anhēnārīki anīλi jañāona jañēie
tō pa ñēim tēna ē lenārre ē lewēren
tō jāo hēja senneñ anēla anciēri ke mān mo mīþa
ien sexe mo maþūskīri mo sāim maþūskīriēma cī;

anīλa

aniilja

anīλa

made of cloth.

This word is in the KÄ“len rephrasal of the 1st article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights due to a cultural metaphor of society as a piece of woven cloth. Originally, the metaphor included the idea of one’s kin in the clan being the up and down threads (the warp) and one’s paternal out-clan kin as being the side to side threads (the weft). A more modern interpretation has one’s kin as the warp and one’s other connections (colleagues, friends, acquaintances) as the weft. In the rephrasal, anīλa modifies anhÄ“nārÄ«ki ‘society’, and is therefore in the collective. So, the phrase anhÄ“nārÄ«ki anīλi refers to society as a piece of cloth, or ‘the cloth of society’.

Our progress:
tō la mēli manaren tēna ñe anhēnārīki anīλi jañāona jañēie
tō pa ñēim tēna ē lenārre ē lewēren
tō jāo hēja senneñ anēla anciēri ke mān mo mīþa
ien sexe mo maþūskīri mo sāim maþūskīriēma cī;

anhēnārīki

anheenaariiki

anhēnārīki

This word is derived from the stative noun anhÄ“nār (‘right, good, proper, correct’) plus the suffix –Ä«ke (denotes an artificial construct). Together, the meaning has shifted a bit, and anhÄ“nārÄ«ki means ‘society’. It’s a collective noun, and the suffix –Ä«ke means that it is something that people have made. It’s also the seventh word in the first clause of the KÄ“len rephrasal of the 1st article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Our progress:
tō la mēli manaren tēna ñe anhēnārīki anīλi jañāona jañēie
tō pa ñēim tēna ē lenārre ē lewēren
tō jāo hēja senneñ anēla anciēri ke mān mo mīþa
ien sexe mo maþūskīri mo sāim maþūskīriēma cī;

tēna

teena

tēna

is a modifier that follows nouns and pronouns and means, basically, each one in a set. So, for a set of two it means both, and for a set of more than two, each. It can only modify dual and paucal pronouns and collective nouns. In the KÄ“len rephrasal of the 1st article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, this word occurs twice, once in the first clause and once in the second.

In the first clause, tÄ“na modifies mÄ“li manaren, a noun phrase consisting of the collective form of mÄ“la followed by the collective pronoun/modifier manaren ‘everyone’. So, mÄ“li manaren tÄ“na ‘each one of all people.’

In the second clause, tÄ“na modifies ñēim, a first person paucal (collective) inclusive pronoun, so again, ‘each one of all of us’.

Today’s word plus yesterday’s:
tō la mēli manaren tēna ñe anhēnārīki anīλi jañāona jañēie
tō pa ñēim tēna ē lenārre ē lewēren
tō jāo hēja senneñ anēla anciēri ke mān mo mīþa
ien sexe mo maþūskīri mo sāim maþūskīriēma cī;

tō … tō jāo

Because all the cool kids are doing it, I am going to spend the next 10 posts discussing the KÄ“len rephrasal of the 1st article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. After that, I’ll continue with some more emotions. So, here goes:

too toospacejaao

tō … tō jāo

This is a coordinating conjunction that is formal and somewhat old-fashioned in usage. The first part (tō) introduces a clause (X) and the second part (tō jāo) introduces clause Y, and together denote that because of X, therefore Y, or X therefore Y.

The Kēlen rephrasal consists of 4 clauses, the first two of which are introduced by tō and the third introduced by tō jāo with the fourth clause subordinate to the third.

So you’ll know what’s coming:

tō la mēli manaren tēna ñe anhēnārīki anīλi jañāona jañēie
tō pa ñēim tēna ē lenārre ē lewēren
tō jāo hēja senneñ anēla anciēri ke mān mo mīþa
ien sexe mo maþūskīri mo sāim maþūskīriēma cī;