annōña 

annoonja

annōña

We’re on the last sentence of 17th Conlang Relay Text:

tō ñi jarāki rā macūma ōl tō jakērþi tō jāo ñi macūma manōña;

This sentence consists of two clauses connected by tōtō jāo which denotes that the first clause is a direct cause of the second clause. The first clause is ñi jarāki rā macÅ«ma ōl tō jakÄ“rþi. Here the instrumentative tō is naming the inanimate agent of ñi. The object of ñi is jarāki rā macÅ«ma ōl “(many) steps on top of the man”, making this clause: “The horses made (many) steps on top of the man” For the second clause it starts “and therefore the man became” manōña. manōña is the animate form of the attribute annōña which means “dead” as in “not alive”. So this sentence is telling us that the thousands of horse trampled the man to death. The end.

That’s the end of the story, as the sentence se jatōrren; indicates.

In full (since it was a short text):
xiēn jē jakērþe japīña;
se macūma; se jakērþe;
il ñamma jacēha ja ñi sāen rā jakērþe ōl nō ā macūma il ñi jakērþe jasērre tō jōrwe ēnne;
ē ñi jakērþe rū macūma pēxa ī ñi sāen mañāka;
ñamma jarāka rū xō ā macūma ānen antānre;
se jarūlōn to jakērþe ī ñi jakērþi ōraen rā xō;
tō ñi jarāki rā macūma ōl tō jakērþi tō jāo ñi macūma manōña;
se jatōrren;

Concerning the bad horse.
The man. The horse.
When the man attempted to get up on the horse, the horse stood upright on two legs
The horse moved away from the man and attacked him.
The man quickly moved away.
The horse gave a loud cry and then thousands of horses arrived.
The horses trampled the man to death.
The end.

ōraen

ooraen

ōraen

We’re on this sentence in the 17th Conlang Relay Text:

se jarūlōn to jakērþe ī ñi jakērþi ōraen rā xō;
The horse made a loud cry and then…ñi jakÄ“rþi ōraen rā xō;

ōraen is another number. It means 10,000 in base 8, which is 4096 in base ten, but really it’s not that exact, and “thousands” is a good translation. “and then thousands of horses went to there”. “came/went to there” is the literal translation, but “arrived” also works.

se jarūlōn to jakērþe ī ñi jakērþi ōraen rā xō;
The horse made a loud cry and then thousands of horses arrived.

jarūlōn

jaruuloon

jarūlōn

The next sentence in the 17th Conlang Relay Text is:

se jarūlōn to jakērþe ī ñi jakērþi ōraen rā xō;

The first clause is a se clause and says that the horse was the source of jarÅ«lōn, which means “a loud cry” or “a shout”. So the horse made a loud horse-sound and then… tune in tomorrow. 🙂

xō

xoo

xō

The next sentence in the 17th Conlang Relay Text is:

ñamma jarāka rū xō ā macūma ānen antānre;

The only unfamiliar word is xō, which means “there, that place”. So this sentence translates to: “The man made steps from there with quickness” or “The man moved quickly away.”

anñāka

annjaaka

anñāka 

The next sentence in the 17th Conlang Relay Text is:

ē ñi jakērþe rū macūma pēxa ī ñi sāen mañāka;

Again, mostly straightforward. “And the horse moved away from the man, and then he (the man) became” mañāka. mañāka is the animate singular form of the attribute anñāka, which means “attacked”. That makes this sentence “And the horse moved away from the man, and then he (the man) became attacked” or “And the horse moved away from the man and then attacked him.”

Ä“nne

eenne

Ä“nne

We’re still on this sentence in the 17th Conlang Relay Text:

il ñamma jacēha ja ñi sāen rā jakērþe ōl nō ā macūma il ñi jakērþe jasērre tō jōrwe ēnne;

When the man attempted to get on to the horse,
then ñi horse jasērre tō jōrwe ēnne.

We know ansÄ“rre, here modifying “horse” means “standing upright”. tō here acts as an instrumentative marker, so jōrwe Ä“nne is the means by which the horse stands upright. jōrwe looks very much like sōrwe which means “one’s legs”. The s– prefix is only used for animates, however, and the horse is not high enough on the personhood scale to qualify. So, an inanimate form is used instead. Then comes Ä“nne, which is the word for the number 2, telling us that the horse stood upright on two legs as opposed to one or three or some other number.

When the man attempted to get on to the horse, then the horse stood upright on two legs.

nō

noo

nō 

We’re on this sentence in the 17th Conlang Relay Text:

il ñamma jacēha ja ñi sāen rā jakērþe ōl nō ā macūma il ñi jakērþe jasērre tō jōrwe ēnne;

When the man attempted ja ñi sāen rā horse ōl nō
then ñi horse jasērre tō jōrwe ēnne.

rā jakÄ“rþe ōl nō looks straightforward. rā plus ōl means “on top of” or “over”. The particle nō generally emphasizes the “to” denoted by rā. However, here, nō is modifying another locative particle rather than a noun or pronoun directly. In this usage nō denotes that there is physical contact with the object of the phrase, namely the horse. So ñi sāen rā jakÄ“rþe ōl nō is “he moved to on top of the horse” or “he got on the horse”.

When the man attempted to get on to the horse,
then ñi horse jasērre tō jōrwe ēnne.

We’ll tackle the last clause tomorrow.

sāen

saaen

sāen 

Now that we have named the story and introduced our characters, the next sentence is:

il ñamma jacēha ja ñi sāen rā jakērþe ōl nō ā macūma il ñi jakērþe jasērre tō jōrwe ēnne;

We already know that ilil means “when” … “then” or “while” … “then”, and we know “horse” and “man” so:

When ñamma jacēha ja ñi sāen rā horse ōl nō ā man
then ñi horse jasērre tō jōrwe ēnne.

We also know that jacÄ“ha means “attempt” and ñamma jacÄ“ha means a 3rd person entity made an attempt, and looking for an ā phrase, we see “man”, which is a third person entity, so “The man attempted”:

When the man attempted ja ñi sāen rā horse ōl nō
then ñi horse jasērre tō jōrwe ēnne.

We know that ja in this position is a relative clause marker, and it is modifying “attempt”, so ñi sāen rā horse ōl nō is what the man attempted, and we know that ñirā denotes motion. Which brings us to today’s word. sāen is the full 3rd person singular pronoun. And our only animate (inanimates don’t get full pronouns), 3rd person singular entity is the man, so the man moved relative to the horse. I will explore the locative rā phrase tomorrow.

jakērþe

jakeerthe

jakērþe

Since the 18th conlang relay is not yet finished, (It ran into some delays. All relays run into some delays.) I will cover my text for the 17th Conlang Relay aka “The Unfinished Relay”, because it is still delayed.

The title of the 17th Conlang Relay Text is:

xiēn jē jakērþe japīña;

which I translate as “Concerning the Bad Horse.” jakÄ“rþe isn’t exactly “horse” but it does refer to a domesticated animal that can be ridden like a horse, so close enough.

The first sentence in this story introduces us to the main participants in the story:

se macūma; se jakērþe;

The man, the horse.