jawēlrūlre

jaweelruulre

jawēlrūlre

Line 1 of the KÄ“len Jabberwocky:

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;

(See yesterday’s post for an introduction.)

“In the afternoon” the jawÄ“lrÅ«lri gyre and gimble around the jaxÄ“wepōma. The word jawÄ“lrÅ«lri consists of –wÄ“lr– (as in jawÄ“lre ‘circle’ and –Å«lr– which is a type of animal. I’ve always thought of jÅ«lri as lizards, or maybe snakes, or something. (Note to self: come up with a workable ecology. Yeah.) Furthermore, the word has two lr’s making it a bit of a tongue twister. Circular lizards (or circling lizards?) are my equivalent of (slithy) toves.

jatarūn jawēha

jataruunspacejaweeha

jatarūn jawēha

This is really two words, but they form a phrase that is used over and over again in the story, so I will discuss them together. jatarÅ«n refers to something that is seen, is in sight, is visible, etc. jawÄ“ha is the inanimate singular of anwÄ“ha which is the attribute “false, deceptive”. Together, jatarÅ«n jawÄ“ha (or jatarÅ«na jawÄ“ha, same thing) refers to a mirage.

Sentence #26:
ē ñi ancālli tō malō aþ ñamma jatōna jaxōsa jōrre aþ ñi sāen rā jatarūni jawēhi nō;
And the sun’s heat came, and he stopped searching for the road and started following mirages.

anwōra

anwoora

anwōra

This is a synonym of yesterday’s word, and denotes a more general state of emptiness. It can also be used in the more abstract sense of void or vacuum.

anwīwa

anwiiwa

anwīwa

This word refers to something devoid of something usually there, so a head devoid of hair (bald), or a landscape devoid of plants (bare).

te ien la jaxūna pa anwōra sū jasāma jamāxxānwe jawīwa ōl sū jañūna ēnne jakōna āñ;
It seemed to be a pattern of emptiness on top of the bare wide plain of the desert between two lines of pebbles.

anwūlīñi

anwuuliinji

anwūlīñi

This is the word for ‘sand’.

anniþen tema jēwāri anhāri nīkan antāoni nīkan anwūlīñi anlōi ē rūjāñ ew sūjīr mo sarōña;
Soon he saw the waters of the lakes with waves with the golden sands around it but not at back.

anwāññe

anwaannje

anwāññe

Speaking of opposites, here is the word for ‘familiar’, and tomorrow I will do ‘unfamiliar’.

la þō nāra pa anwāññe nā;
There’s something very familiar about all this.

mawēhēl

maweeheel

mawēhēl

Continuing on our theme, mawÄ“hÄ“l is a liar. This is essentially yesterday’s word with the suffix –Ä“l. Most words that end in –Ä“l refer to a person.

la sāen mawēhēl mawehē ma ñamma jawēhi;
“S/he is a lying liar who lies.”

jawēha

jaweeha

jawēha

jawÄ“ha refers to a false thing, which makes it the opposite of yesterday’s word.

ñarra jawēha lā;
“You lie!”