macūcū

macuucuu

macūcū

Line 4 of the KÄ“len Jabberwocky:

to makīmaþālen masāknenūren to macūcū matū ma ñi rū ma pēxa cī;

(See Nov 7th’s post for an introduction.)

This is another nonsense word, with completely made-up nonsense syllables that alliterate with macāppacāe. It is also pronounced eerily like Jub Jub.

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;
to makīmaþālen masāknenūren to macūcū matū ma ñi rū ma pēxa cī;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed.
     The lost chicken-pigs make cough-cries!

Beware macāppacāe, its biting teeth, its many catching claws,
the frumious makīmaþālen, macūcū

macāppacāe

macaappacaae

macāppacāe

Line 3 of the KÄ“len Jabberwocky:

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;

(See Nov 7th’s post for an introduction.)

Beware macāppacāe – its jasÅ«pa teeth, its many jaþāla claws.

macāppacāe is the Jabberwock. First, take a look at the word. ‘c’ and ‘p’ are the only KÄ“len letters that lean over, and this word has two of each. Also, if you rotate one, you get the other, giving this word a topsy-turvy look.

cāppacāe = cāe ‘belly’ (or cāc ‘itch’ or cāh ‘fever’) + pac ‘wild animal’ + cāe again. Furthermore, it is animate, giving it the status of a volitional being, which is appropriate for a capitalized Monster and the subject of our poem.

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed.
     The lost chicken-pigs make cough-cries!

Beware macāppacāe

jacāora

jacaaora

jacāora

And this is the word for a ball. Note that it is very close to yesterday’s word. The difference is that the stem for yesterday’s word is –ecāor– while the stem for today’s word is –cāor-. That e– prefix signals abstraction.

jacēppe

jaceeppe

jacēppe

This is a specific type of container, namely one that is open on the top and has a handle for carrying – a bucket.

pa jacēppe antāŋŋe;
There’s a hole in the bucket.

ancēxa

anceexa

ancēxa

This refers to a feeling of immediate hope for the unknown future or the anticipation of a positive outcome.

Sentence #28:
il ānnalon ānen ancēxa wā il ñi sāen rā jatarūni jawēhi nō;
All morning without hope, he followed mirages.

Sentence #29:
illorren ñamma jān japōññe ja wā ñi rū sāen pēxa;
Finally, he found one that did not go away from him.

ancāēl

ancaaeel

ancāēl

Clay. It is probably not a coincidence that the word for bowl (jacēla) looks similar.

Like other words for minerals, the singular refers to a piece or portion of the substance.

ñi jakerāka jēnēie tō jacāēl;
Flesh-colored pigment is made from clay.

ancē

ancee

ancē

On to the next sentence of the LCC4 relay text, sentence 10:

wā pa riēn ancē ja serle ien jasōra wījtē ja la lewēra lā;

wā pa riēn ancē consists of the negative clause-level modifier
wā, the relational pa, the 2nd person singular pronoun riÄ“n, and the stative noun ancÄ“ “ability”. Not having verbs, one doesn’t have modals like “can” either, and so those concepts have to be conveyed some other way (if at all). wā pa riÄ“n ancÄ“ is “You haven’t the ability” or “You can’t”. What you can’t do is in the subordinate clause modifying ancÄ“. More on that tomorrow.

jacērja

jaceerja

jacērja

The third sentence of the LCC4 relay text:

ñamma jacērja ja semme jasōri rēha ā λi tānre ma ñi malāmen;

This one has two relative clauses! The main clause is ñamma jacÄ“rja and the agent referred to in ñamma is renamed in ā λi tānre. jacÄ“rja means “choice” or “decision”. So “Tānre made a choice” or “Tānre chose”.

The first relative clause is ja semme jasōri rÄ“ha and it modifies jacÄ“rja, thus detailing the choice that Tānre made. semme is se plus a 3rd person source and a 3rd person beneficiary, jasōri “words” is the object of se, and rÄ“ha is a future marker. The choice, then is for someone (Tānre) to give someone else (the pretty woman) words, or to say something to someone.

So far we have: Tānre made a choice to say something to her.

I will tackle the second relative clause tomorrow.

ancē

ancee

ancē

Still on the seventh sentence of the Babel text:

il tamma ien ē pa mēli anānīke ī pa sāim antaxōni ān tēna ī la ankāe ancēji ja ñatta rēha pa jāo jānne;

ancÄ“ denotes the quality or attribute of “doable” or “able to be done”. It is here in the collective plural modifying ankāe. Taken together, the phrase ankāe ancÄ“ji means something like “doable deeds”, or “deeds that can be done”. The phrase is then modified by the subordinate clause ja ñatta rÄ“ha and by the pa clause pa jāo jānne. More on that tomorrow.