jatū

jatuu

jatū

Line 4 of the KÄ“len Jabberwocky:

to makīmaþālen masāknenūren to macūcū matū ñi ma rū ma pēxa cī;

(See Nov 7th’s post for an introduction.)

This is the word for bird, or flying thing really, since I hate birds and refuse to allow any on my planet. (Bats, on the other hand, are cool.) It’s been turned into an animate noun here, to match macÅ«cÅ«, and the assonance is not a coincidence. 🙂

ñi ma rÅ« ma pÄ“xa cÄ« is “(one) be away from him/her/them”.

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;
to makīmaþālen masāknenūren to macūcū matū ñi ma rū ma pēxa cī;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed.
     The lost chicken-pigs make cough-cries!

Beware macāppacāe, its biting teeth, its many catching claws,
the frumious makīmaþālen, the macūcū bird
     Be away from them.

sakāca

sakaaca

sakāca

Line 3 of the KÄ“len Jabberwocky:

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;

(See Nov 7th’s post for an introduction.)

Technically, I have blogged this word already. On February 8th, 2010 I defined this word to mean “one’s fingernails and toenails”. But this is actually the word jakāca which refers to an animal’s claws. It’s been transformed into an obligatorily possessed body part word because the claws belong to macāppacāe, an animate and volitional being.

sakāca jaþāla nā is (his) many catching claws. nā is actually there for two reasons: 1) to make the syllable count match the other lines, and 2) because each line ends with a syllable containing a long vowel. nā being a post-positional modifier is a very useful word. 🙂

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed.
     The lost chicken-pigs make cough-cries!

Beware macāppacāe, its biting teeth, its many catching claws.

jarōhāþa

jaroohaatha

jarōhāþa

Line 2 of the KÄ“len Jabberwocky:

se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

(See Monday’s post for an introduction.)

The jarōhāþi make cough-cries!

jarōhāþa is a compound of rō ‘lost’ and hāþ, a small domesticated animal like a chicken or a pig. Lost chicken-pigs. Also the -hā- is alliterated with the -kāh- in the previous noun.

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed. The lost chicken-pigs make cough-cries!

jatēññāntetūrāŋŋen

jaeennjaantetuuraanngen

jatēññāntetūrāŋŋen

Line 2 of the KÄ“len Jabberwocky:

se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

(See Monday’s post for an introduction.)

anrāŋŋen means the quality of inducing a frown, the quality of being annoying. The singular form jarāŋŋen as the object of se therefore means “annoyed”. And who (or what) is annoyed? jatēññāntetÅ«rāŋŋeni.

jatēññāntetÅ«rāŋŋen = tēñ ‘thin’ + ñānte ‘wing’ + tÅ« ‘bird’ + rāŋŋen ‘annoyed’. (easily annoyed thin-winged birds) Or, maybe it is tēññ(ex) ‘conflicted’ + ānte ‘joy’ + tÅ« ‘bird’ + rāŋŋe ‘spider’? (conflicted yet basically joyful bird-spiders) Or, tÄ“n ‘all’ + ñānte ‘wing’ + tÅ«r ‘injury’ + āŋŋen ‘pointy’? (all-winged pointy injury-causing things (living needles with wings, and they are annoyed! :twisted:))

Whichever you choose, it refers to “mimsy borogoves”.
(Then there’s double ññ and double Å‹Å‹ in the same word!)

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed. …

jawēlrūlre

jaweelruulre

jawēlrūlre

Line 1 of the KÄ“len Jabberwocky:

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;

(See yesterday’s post for an introduction.)

“In the afternoon” the jawÄ“lrÅ«lri gyre and gimble around the jaxÄ“wepōma. The word jawÄ“lrÅ«lri consists of –wÄ“lr– (as in jawÄ“lre ‘circle’ and –Å«lr– which is a type of animal. I’ve always thought of jÅ«lri as lizards, or maybe snakes, or something. (Note to self: come up with a workable ecology. Yeah.) Furthermore, the word has two lr’s making it a bit of a tongue twister. Circular lizards (or circling lizards?) are my equivalent of (slithy) toves.

japēlte

japeelte

japēlte

Here’s the third sentence of the 18th Conlang Relay Text

samma japēlti mo jaxēxi ja ē ñi jarewēλi ī ñi jahūwi ī ñi jasēþa ñe jawēlrienāl rū jatāsa λi xēþa āñ;

That one’s nice and long and complicated. The word japÄ“lte, here in the plural, refers to a sound that an animal makes, so “barking” would be ok, or “bleating”. It’s plural, so there’s more than one sound, and it is the object of se, so something animate is emitting it, and the only animate animal we have is the tÅ«mse from the second sentence. The mo phrase denotes the recipient of the barks (what the tÅ«mse is barking at), and I will discuss that tomorrow.

jatūmse

jatuumse

jatūmse

We’re on the second sentence of the 18th Conlang Relay Text

sū mamō salōmme ñi matūmse manīsen marēwa;

The word jatūmse refers to a small predator often kept as a pet. So, cat or ferret or dog or some other sort of small predator kept as a pet. In this text, the word has been elevated to animacy (or personhood), making it an actor in the story.

jakērþe

jakeerthe

jakērþe

Since the 18th conlang relay is not yet finished, (It ran into some delays. All relays run into some delays.) I will cover my text for the 17th Conlang Relay aka “The Unfinished Relay”, because it is still delayed.

The title of the 17th Conlang Relay Text is:

xiēn jē jakērþe japīña;

which I translate as “Concerning the Bad Horse.” jakÄ“rþe isn’t exactly “horse” but it does refer to a domesticated animal that can be ridden like a horse, so close enough.

The first sentence in this story introduces us to the main participants in the story:

se macūma; se jakērþe;

The man, the horse.

japāca

japaaca

japāca

wild animal, animal native to the area.

This is a 2-day post, so for Saturday and Sunday, OK? Maybe even Monday.

pa þō jekiēn japāci jawāññīwi nā;
This land has many unfamiliar animals.

Penguins:

P9020003sm

Sea Lion pup:

IMG_0129sm

Wedge-tail eagle:

P9090094sm

Lorikeets:

IMG_0309sm

Emu:

P9130057sm

Fish (whose specific name I forgot already):

P9150078sm

Bats! Flying foxes they’re called and they roost en masse in the trees near our hotel in Cairns:

P9160014sm

Ulysses butterfly:

P9170055

Tree frogs:

P9170072

A “dragon”, or monitor lizard:

IMG_0320sm

A parentie, the largest lizard in Australia:

P9180032sm

Some kangaroos:

P9090140sm

P9070025sm

(I didn’t get any good pictures of wallabies. BTW, the difference between a wallaby and a kangaroo: one plays rugby league and the other plays rugby union.:)

Koalas:

P9090133sm

P9180029

A cassowary:

P9180037sm

I saw several echidnas but didn’t get any good pictures.

And a platypus:

platypus mpg
or
platypus avi