anhēīñi

anheeiinji

anhēīñi

The fourth sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

la liēþ sū anhēīñi;

la liēþ sÅ« is an easy “We are at…”. anhēīñi refers to an expanse of a plant that acts as a ground cover and has a sweet smell. It is also native to TÄ“rjemar.

la liēþ sū anhēīñi;
We are at a field of anhēīñi

ewaþ

ewath

ewaþ

The third sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

la jalāeþa jarōllōl ewaþ ñi liēþ rā jalāe ālme;

ewaþ is a conjunction joining the la clause and the ñi clause. It means something like “yet” or “but”. So the interpretation of the la clause really is “The mountain pass is covered with snow, but…” and then the ñi clause.

The ñi clause is straight-forward. liēþ, as discussed before, is the first person plural exclusive pronoun. rā jalāe ālme is a locative phrase meaning “across the mountain”.

la jalāeþa jarōllōl ewaþ ñi liēþ rā jalāe ālme;
The mountain pass is covered with snow, but we cross the mountain.

anrōllōl

anroollool

anrōllōl

The third sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

la jalāeþa jarōllōl ewaþ ñi liēþ rā jalāe ālme;

jarōllōl is the inanimate singular form of the attribute anrōllōl which means “covered with snow”. Here it is modifying jalāeþa to make the phrase jalāeþa jarōllōl or “snow-covered mountain pass” or, since this is a la clause, “the mountain pass is covered with snow”.

anŋūta

annguuta

anŋūta

The second sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

pa jarēþa anŋūta;

Very simple. We already know that jarēþa means “journey”, and pa denotes a whole::part relationship or a thing::attribute relationship and stative nouns are usually attributes, so “The journey is/was …” whatever anÅ‹Å«ta means. It means “difficult” as in “not easy” and “requiring effort”.

pa jarēþa anŋūta;
The journey was difficult.

jīlpēneha

jiilpeeneha

jīlpēneha

The first sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

il ñi liēþ rā anālhāri il jīlpēneha;

Earth has seasons due to its axial tilt. On a planet like Earth, jīlpēneha would refer to Spring. On Tērjemar, which has minimal axial tilt, jīlpēneha is planting time, and that time can vary from place to place and plant to plant and maybe occur multiple times in a year. But the poor translator had to come up with something, so:

il ñi liēþ rā anālhāri il jīlpēneha;
We went to the ocean at planting time.

liēþ

lieeth

liēþ

Continuing with relay texts, I said I’d do the 17th relay text, but I have changed my mind. I am going to do the Second Inverse Relay text instead. An inverse relay is where some other poor sucker someone else gets to translate a text into your conlang and then you get it and translate it into the next person’s conlang. Anyway, I’ll do the 17th later. Hopefully, after the 18th, which is still going on.

The first sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text is:

il ñi liēþ rā anālhāri il jīlpēneha;

The object of ñi here is liēþ, which is the first person exclusive plural pronoun. So the narrator is talking about groups of people, of which the narrator is part of one group and the listener is not part of any group.

rā anālhāri is “to the ocean”, so ñi liēþ rā anālhāri is “We go/went to the ocean”. All that is left is the il phrase, il jÄ«lpÄ“neha, which I will discuss tomorrow.