jīlcīlre

jiilciilre

jīlcīlre

The eighth and final sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

il ñi liēþ rāmāra il jīlcīlre;

This one is straightforward. ñi liēþ rāmāra is “we go home” and ilil jÄ«lcÄ«lre is “when” plus jÄ«lcÄ«lre which is a word for a period of cold weather, and in a planet with seasons might refer to winter.

il ñi liēþ rāmāra il jīlcīlre;
We go home in the winter.

anñicālte

annjicaalte

anñicālte

The seventh sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

ñalta jahōhhe jahē tō ja ñalta jañicālte sū jahāwekien;

anñicālte is the word for “traded” or “something for trading”. So, this sentence is “we make good cooked food” followed by the instrument-marker tō followed by a relative pronoun ja followed by the ñi clause “we make trade” followed by the locative phrase sÅ« jahāwekien “at the shore”. Put that all together and we get:

ñalta jahōhhe jahē tō ja ñalta jañicālte sū jahāwekien;
We make good cooked food from that which we trade at the shore.

anhōhhe

anhoohhe

anhōhhe

The seventh sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

ñalta jahōhhe jahē tō ja ñalta jañicālte sū jahāwekien;

anhōhhe is a stative noun meaning “cooked or otherwise prepared for eating” and is used to describe food. In the sentence, jahōhhe is in the inanimate singular does not modify anything in the sentence. This construction is rather common, actually, and so jahōhhe is “something cooked or otherwise prepared for eating” or “cooked food”. It is further modified by anhÄ“, “good” so jahōhhe jahÄ“ is “good cooked food”. ñalta says that a 1st person exclusive plural entity is the agent or cause of that good food, and the tō phrase further elaborates a second cause. More on that tomorrow.

ansēlne

anseelne

ansēlne

The sixth sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

il ñi liēþ rā anmāxxānwi nīkan jarēlān jēspe il ñi anālhāri ansēlni;

ansēlne refers to a view and means visible or in view. So, ñi anālhāri ansēlni is the ocean comes into view/becomes visible. The ilil conjunction connects these two clauses:

il ñi liēþ rā anmāxxānwi nīkan jarēlān jēspe il ñi anālhāri ansēlni;
Then we go to a (wide) plain with a continuing light wind then we make sight of the ocean.

anēspe

aneespe

anēspe

The sixth sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

il ñi liēþ rā anmāxxānwi nīkan jarēlān jēspe il ñi anālhāri ansēlni;

jÄ“spe is the inanimate singular form of anÄ“spe which means “continuing in the same state or place, waiting”, so jarÄ“lān jÄ“spe is a continuing light wind, making ñi liēþ rā anmāxxānwi nÄ«kan jarÄ“lān jÄ“spe “We go to a (wide) plain with a continuing light wind.”

jarēlān

jareelaan

jarēlān

The sixth sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

il ñi liēþ rā anmāxxānwi nīkan jarēlān jēspe il ñi anālhāri ansēlni;

nÄ«kan jarÄ“lān jÄ“spe is a phrase that modifies yesterday’s word anmāxxānwi and means “together with” something something. The first something, jarÄ“lān is the word for a light wind. I’ll cover jÄ“spe tomorrow.

jamāxxanwe 

jamaaxxanwe

jamāxxanwe 

The sixth sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

il ñi liēþ rā anmāxxānwi nīkan jarēlān jēspe il ñi anālhāri ansēlni;

anmāxxānwi is an alternate, collective form of jamāxxanwe which is a large, flat plain. Since collectives are used to denote expanses of something, it is just as accurate to use a collective form to mean “plain” as it is to use the singular. So ñi liēþ rā anmāxxānwi “We go to a (wide) plain”. More of the sentence tomorrow.

jakēþa

jakeetha

jakēþa

The fifth sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

selte jālme japāsre to jakēþa jatāra;

jakēþa is a type of plant, specifically something like a large tree, one that is mostly trunk, and so the word can also refer more generally to a tree trunk. jatāra is the inanimate singular form of the familiar antāra “fallen”. So, jakēþa jatāra is a fallen trunk.

selte jālme japāsre to jakēþa jatāra;
We experience a hindered fording due to a fallen tree trunk.

anpāsre

anpaasre

anpāsre

The fifth sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

selte jālme japāsre to jakēþa jatāra;

japāsre is the inanimate singular form of anpāsre, which describes something that is an obstacle, hindering one from one’s goal. So jālme japāsre is a hindered crossing or fording.

“We experience a hindered fording due to…”

jālme

jaalme

jālme

The fifth sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

selte jālme japāsre to jakēþa jatāra;

selte here says that there is a 1st person plural experiencer. What ‘we’ experience is jālme japāsre and the source of the experience is jakēþa jatāra. Several unfamiliar words here. First, jālme which means simply a place of crossing, like a ford in the river. I’ll discuss japāsre tomorrow.