jatārien

jataarien

jatārien

This is the direction “north-west” and is derived from the stem –tār– “falling” though it probably refers to another word derived from –tār-, namely jatārharrien (Sep 13, 2010) “waterfall” as the legendary City of Waterfalls (Āttarein) was in the north-west.

antāwa

antaawa

antāwa

This is the opposite of yesterday’s word, meaning “low” in elevation (or more specifically, “below”) and “down” or “beneath” in direction. It is related to the locative particle

jatū

jatuu

jatū

Line 4 of the Kēlen Jabberwocky:

to makīmaþālen masāknenūren to macūcū matū ñi ma rū ma pēxa cī;

(See Nov 7th’s post for an introduction.)

This is the word for bird, or flying thing really, since I hate birds and refuse to allow any on my planet. (Bats, on the other hand, are cool.) It’s been turned into an animate noun here, to match macūcū, and the assonance is not a coincidence. 🙂

ñi ma rū ma pēxa cī is “(one) be away from him/her/them”.

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;
to makīmaþālen masāknenūren to macūcū matū ñi ma rū ma pēxa cī;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed.
     The lost chicken-pigs make cough-cries!

Beware macāppacāe, its biting teeth, its many catching claws,
the frumious makīmaþālen, the macūcū bird
     Be away from them.

jatēññāntetūrāŋŋen

jaeennjaantetuuraanngen

jatēññāntetūrāŋŋen

Line 2 of the Kēlen Jabberwocky:

se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

(See Monday’s post for an introduction.)

anrāŋŋen means the quality of inducing a frown, the quality of being annoying. The singular form jarāŋŋen as the object of se therefore means “annoyed”. And who (or what) is annoyed? jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni.

jatēññāntetūrāŋŋen = tēñ ‘thin’ + ñānte ‘wing’ + ‘bird’ + rāŋŋen ‘annoyed’. (easily annoyed thin-winged birds) Or, maybe it is tēññ(ex) ‘conflicted’ + ānte ‘joy’ + ‘bird’ + rāŋŋe ‘spider’? (conflicted yet basically joyful bird-spiders) Or, tēn ‘all’ + ñānte ‘wing’ + tūr ‘injury’ + āŋŋen ‘pointy’? (all-winged pointy injury-causing things (living needles with wings, and they are annoyed! :twisted:))

Whichever you choose, it refers to “mimsy borogoves”.
(Then there’s double ññ and double ŋŋ in the same word!)

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed. …

matānae

mataanae

matānae

This is the word for “crowd”. It looks vaguely singular until one realized that the underlying form is –tānaj-. The (hypothetical) singular form of such a word would be matānaja. Adding an –i to make a collective (-i is collective with animates and plural with inanimates.) produces matānaji which simplifies to matānae.

Sentence #39:
ē ñatta anxūri ankōrji ē ñatta sāim matanāe rājakiē ē tetme jatēmmēri luhañen ew ñi mawae rājanū;
And they opened the gates and made a crowd beyond it and called to him still, but none came to this side.

jatanīsa

jataniisa

jatanīsa

This is an adornment worn on the body for decoration, like jewelry or beads or some such thing. It is related to janīsa “bead”.

Sentence #36:
il ñi sapāla sū xō il ñi mēli rū jamāonre rā jatarōn jawēha jahāwa nū nīkan anīλi nīkan antanīsi nīkan anlāni nīkan anlāsi;
While he was there weeping, people came from the city to near the edge of the mirage with cloths and decorations and greetings and welcomes.

antarūnīwe

antaruuniiwe

antarūnīwe

Remember antarūn, which refers to something visible or seen? antarūnīwe refers to something that is no longer visible.

Sentence #31:
il wā ñi jatarūn jawēha ew rū xō pēxa ew jatarūnīwe il ñi sāen rā xō;
And yet the mirage did not move away or disappear when he went there.

jatarūn jawēha

jataruunspacejaweeha

jatarūn jawēha

This is really two words, but they form a phrase that is used over and over again in the story, so I will discuss them together. jatarūn refers to something that is seen, is in sight, is visible, etc. jawēha is the inanimate singular of anwēha which is the attribute “false, deceptive”. Together, jatarūn jawēha (or jatarūna jawēha, same thing) refers to a mirage.

Sentence #26:
ē ñi ancālli tō malō aþ ñamma jatōna jaxōsa jōrre aþ ñi sāen rā jatarūni jawēhi nō;
And the sun’s heat came, and he stopped searching for the road and started following mirages.