Ä“nne

eenne

Ä“nne

We’re still on this sentence in the 17th Conlang Relay Text:

il ñamma jacēha ja ñi sāen rā jakērþe ōl nō ā macūma il ñi jakērþe jasērre tō jōrwe ēnne;

When the man attempted to get on to the horse,
then ñi horse jasērre tō jōrwe ēnne.

We know ansÄ“rre, here modifying “horse” means “standing upright”. tō here acts as an instrumentative marker, so jōrwe Ä“nne is the means by which the horse stands upright. jōrwe looks very much like sōrwe which means “one’s legs”. The s– prefix is only used for animates, however, and the horse is not high enough on the personhood scale to qualify. So, an inanimate form is used instead. Then comes Ä“nne, which is the word for the number 2, telling us that the horse stood upright on two legs as opposed to one or three or some other number.

When the man attempted to get on to the horse, then the horse stood upright on two legs.