nō

noo

nō 

We’re on this sentence in the 17th Conlang Relay Text:

il ñamma jacēha ja ñi sāen rā jakērþe ōl nō ā macūma il ñi jakērþe jasērre tō jōrwe ēnne;

When the man attempted ja ñi sāen rā horse ōl nō
then ñi horse jasērre tō jōrwe ēnne.

rā jakÄ“rþe ōl nō looks straightforward. rā plus ōl means “on top of” or “over”. The particle nō generally emphasizes the “to” denoted by rā. However, here, nō is modifying another locative particle rather than a noun or pronoun directly. In this usage nō denotes that there is physical contact with the object of the phrase, namely the horse. So ñi sāen rā jakÄ“rþe ōl nō is “he moved to on top of the horse” or “he got on the horse”.

When the man attempted to get on to the horse,
then ñi horse jasērre tō jōrwe ēnne.

We’ll tackle the last clause tomorrow.