anhēnār

anheenaar

anhēnār

anhÄ“nār is derived from –hÄ“– ‘good’ and –nār– ‘whole’. It refers to the proper order of things, the quality of being expectedly useful and appropriate, right, correct, true, and proper. It is understood that what is claimed to be right, correct, true, and proper isn’t necessarily so, and that the only way to tell if something is truly anhÄ“nār is to look at the long term consequences of the action, event, or behavior.

anmōma

anmooma

anmōma

This is the attribute “flat” and the abstraction “flatness”.

ñamma anāmāesi anmōmi tō jacāta;
She flattened ants with a shoe.

anālneha

anaalneha

anālneha

This refers to the quality of being fortunate or of causing (good) fortune.

Sentence #58:
ē temme jatasēña ke macēna sakū ī tetme jatēmmēri ewaþ ñi sāen rā anhāri anālnehi tō tūaþ ñamma sāen sawūra jarēŋŋe;
The woman signed him warning and the people called to him, yet he went to the fortunate water in order to wet his mouth.

ankēwa

ankeewa

ankēwa

As an abstraction, this means “weariness”. ānen ankÄ“wa is “with weariness” or “wearily”.

Sentence #56:
ē ānen ankēwa ī sakōλa jasīra ñi sāen rā jatarūna jawēha anhāri jahāwa;
With weariness and a dry throat, he went to the edge of the mirage water.

Sentence #57:
tema jaxiēna ien ñamma jacērja āl;
He knew what he was choosing.

anōmen

anoomen

anōmen

As an attribute, this means having greater than expected length. As an abstract concept, it means length.

Sentence #45:
ñatta jacēha ja ñatta sāen rā jaþīña nō rā jatēwa jōmen nīkan jacūteni jalōi sū jēwār kiē sū ankōnōri anlūñi tā;
They tried to make him go along a path to a long table with shining cups at the far side of the lake under the gleaming towers.

Sentence #46:
ñi sāen rū sāim pēxa rā jatarūni jawēhi jēwāri anhāri ī;
Again he went away from them to the waters of the mirage lakes.

anñiñēka

annjinjeeka

anñiñēka

This refers to the feeling of eagerness. ānen anñiñēka would be “eagerly”.

Sentence #38:
ē tema jamārwakie aþ ānen anñiñēka tetme jatēmmēri aþ ānen ankewāla ñi sāen rā sāim rā anxūrimma;
He was amazed, and they called to him with eagerness, and with caution, he went to them, to their gates.

ancēxa

anceexa

ancēxa

This refers to a feeling of immediate hope for the unknown future or the anticipation of a positive outcome.

Sentence #28:
il ānnalon ānen ancēxa wā il ñi sāen rā jatarūni jawēhi nō;
All morning without hope, he followed mirages.

Sentence #29:
illorren ñamma jān japōññe ja wā ñi rū sāen pēxa;
Finally, he found one that did not go away from him.

ansōnen

ansoonen

ansōnen

The abstract idea of “wisdom”. This is one of my favorite sentences in the story.

Sentence #27:
ē te sarōña pa ansōnen nā ñe sasōna ē il tema anhāri il ñi sāen rājanō;
His eyes had more wisdom than his mind and when water was seen, he went to it.

anxōsa

anxoosa

anxōsa

This attribute refers to something being searched for. The inanimate singular can also refer to the event of looking for something. Here jatōna jaxōsa jōrre is: the road, it’s being searched for, the ending of that. It’s probably not the way a better writer (than me) would put it since jōrre is really only modifying jaxōsa and not jatōna jaxōsa.

Sentence #25:
ē ñi ancālli tō malō aþ ñamma jatōna jaxōsa jōrre aþ ñi sāen rā jatarūni jawēhi nō;
And the sun’s heat came, and he stopped searching for the road and started following mirages.