jalātaren

jalaataren

jalātaren

This is the word for south-east. It might be derived from –lāj– ‘mountain’. Unlike the other direction words, this one has a slightly irregular paradigm. Most of the direction words vary between a form that ends with –ien and a form that ends in –ie. The nouns, both singular and stative, use the –ien form, as does the sÅ«– form. The rā– and rÅ«– forms use the –ie form. For example, using yesterday’s word:

jahāwien the south-west
sūhāwien at or in the south-west
rāhāwie to the south-west
rūhāwie from the south-west

With today’s word the forms are: jalātaren, sÅ«lātaren, rālātie, rÅ«lātie. I have no idea where that –r– came from, nor where it went.

jōrrien

joorrien

jōrrien

This is the word for “west”, and as “east” is derived from a stem meaning “beginning, so “west” is derived from –ōrr– “end”.

jatārien

jataarien

jatārien

This is the direction “north-west” and is derived from the stem –tār– “falling” though it probably refers to another word derived from –tār-, namely jatārharrien (Sep 13, 2010) “waterfall” as the legendary City of Waterfalls (Ä€ttarein) was in the north-west.

jasīrien

jasiirien

jasīrien

Since I just did the words for far and near, I thought I’d do directions. I’ve already done “east” jānnien (Nov 30, 2010) and I’ve done the attribute “north” (Oct 31, 2010), but not the direction itself. So: jasÄ«rien means the north. It is derived from the stem –sÄ«r– “dry”.