jīlcīlre

jiilciilre

jīlcīlre

The eighth and final sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

il ñi liēþ rāmāra il jīlcīlre;

This one is straightforward. ñi liēþ rāmāra is “we go home” and ilil jÄ«lcÄ«lre is “when” plus jÄ«lcÄ«lre which is a word for a period of cold weather, and in a planet with seasons might refer to winter.

il ñi liēþ rāmāra il jīlcīlre;
We go home in the winter.

jarēlān

jareelaan

jarēlān

The sixth sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

il ñi liēþ rā anmāxxānwi nīkan jarēlān jēspe il ñi anālhāri ansēlni;

nÄ«kan jarÄ“lān jÄ“spe is a phrase that modifies yesterday’s word anmāxxānwi and means “together with” something something. The first something, jarÄ“lān is the word for a light wind. I’ll cover jÄ“spe tomorrow.

anālre

anaalre

anālre

Continuing with our theme, today we start on the text for the LCC3 Relay. The original text was a poem contributed by David J Peterson. I have mixed feelings about translating poetry. I’ve never been good at poetry, even in a conlang. On the other hand, it does provide an opportunity to mess with the syntax and vocabulary. And having a refrain means less to translate, which can be a plus or a minus.

So, the first line:

la liēn sū anālhāri anālri jahāwa ñi antāoni anhūwi rūjapēxa;

Unfamiliar words include anālri, jahāwa, and anhūwi.

anālri is the stative anālre inflected to modify anālhāri “ocean”. anālre means “having to do with storms, having the quality of a storm” or “stormy”, so anālhāri anālri is “stormy ocean”.

Tomorrow jahāwa.

ancīlri

anciilri

ancīlri

frost. The stative form ancÄ«lre retains the meaning ‘frosty’ but has expanded to cover any state considered to be ‘chilly’ or ‘cold’.

jūrāna and anūra

juuraana

jūrāna

the wind. This is the default word for wind considered as a singular entity. The collective anÅ«rāni can be used for wind as a series of gusts, but more often the collective anÅ«ri is used instead. (The –ān– in the root –Å«rān– is a singular marker.)

anuura

anūra

the air, the atmosphere. This word can also refer to any movement in the air. Thus anūri can be used to refer to wind, or to blowing air, or the rushing by of air.

ñamma anūri nā ā mūrāna masīrien
The North Wind made much moving-air.

Wind is in the animate singular here rather than the usual inanimate singular as above because the North Wind is a character in the story.

ankēōren

ankeeooren

ankēōren

overcast, so a sheet of cloud, gray in color, covering the whole sky. One might sometimes encounter the non-standard word ankēōri for a grouping of clouds, but never jakēōr for a single cloud.

jalāra

jalaara

jalāra

a cloud, especially of the white and fluffy type. Partly cloudy might be called ānen anlāri using the collective form for a group of clouds.

jālre

jaalre

jālre

a storm, with wind, rain, thunder, or lightning. A big storm might be referred to in the collective anālri in recognition of all the different parts and events that occur during a storm.