jakāellīñ

jakaaelliinj

jakāellīñ

Finally, the 18th Conlang Relay text. I loved this text. With a little tweaking (which I did, of course) it was a story about two legendary KÄ“leni culture-heroes. 🙂

The first sentence is:

ñi jakāellīñ jarēspe sū janūwa ī;

And right away, as the object of ñi, we have an unfamiliar word. I had to create this word for the relay, though I had the concept of the thing already. I also had to create related words, of course. Anyway, jakāellīñ refers to a small (6-30 inches in height) statue, traditionally carved from jade (ankāelle) though other materials can be used. Traditional subjects for jakāellīñi include deities, heroes, ancestors, animals, and sometimes trees. They are usually displayed in niches decorated with cloth and plant matter, and they are considered lucky. They are not used directly as idols or for worship, despite the fact that many have a religious significance.

jatāña

jataanja

jatāña

We’re still on the ninth sentence in the 14th Conlang Relay Text:

se jasāla mo jātaren ja senne jatāña jaxēwa;

and so far we have “Give song for the ātaren tree that gives us …” sentence. The next word is jatāña, which refers to a screen or a trellis or something else (like maybe the intertwined branches of a tree) that filters the light and produces shade. It is modified by jaxÄ“wa, which I will discuss tomorrow.

jacālme

jacaalme

jacālme

Brick, as in a building block of shaped clay. The third sentence of the Babel text has to do with bricks.

ē teteñ ien hēja ñanna jacālmi jajūti nā
aþ te sāim nīkan jacālmi ñe jakīþi
aþ te sāim nīkan ancēwri ñe anhērmi;

The word even appears twice, both times in the plural. Other nouns appearing in this sentence include the stative anjÅ«ta “baked” appearing as jajÅ«ti and modifying jacālmi to make “baked bricks”, the plural jakīþi “rocks, stones”, and the collectives ancÄ“wri and anhÄ“rmi.