jaraxēwa

jaraxeewa

jaraxēwa

This is another word for evening, and sometimes for dawn. More specifically it means twilight. This isn’t a formal division of the day. It can also refer to night, or rather the very beginning or the very end of night.

il ñi jaraxēwa il ñamma jaxōsa jōrre;
Night came, and he stopped searching.

jōrralon

joorralon

jōrralon

This is the fourth and last division of the day, covering from noon until sunset.

la jōrralon jālne cī;
Have a good afternoon.

I apparently don’t have words for “noon” or “midnight” or “sunrise” or “sunset”. I will have to think about that.

jānnalon

jaannalon

jānnalon

jānnalon is the morning, from sunrise until noon.

la jānnalon jālne cī;
Have a good morning.

The variant form ānnalon is also possible in il phrases.

il ānnalon ānen ancēxa wā il ñi sāen rā jatarūni jawēhi nō;
All morning without hope, he followed mirages.

jōrraxel

joorraxel

jōrraxel

The next division of the day is jōrraxel, which is midnight until sunrise.

la jōrraxel jālne cī;
Have a good night.

The corresponding il phrase is il jōrraxel or il ōrraxel. The difference is a matter of dialect, or maybe idiolect.

The words jānnaxel and jōrraxel are related to the word for night jaxāela, and the words jānne “beginning” and anōrre “end”

jānnaxel

jaannaxel

jānnaxel

Moons are generally visible at night, and this word refers to the time of night between sunset and midnight.

la jānnaxel jālne cī;
Have a good evening.

The phrase il jānnaxel (and sometimes il ānnaxel) means in or during the evening.

antēña

anteenja

antēña

antēña refers to something thin, long, and/or narrow. So jaxōññāoni jalōnni jatēñi is “thin veins of gold” as might appear in marble. It also refers to the sixth or last phase of the moon, the thin sliver or crescent before a new moon. I still do not know how many moons I have, but at least I have words for the phases. 🙂

antēwre

anteewre

antēwre

antēwre means thick or fat, and so is the appropriate word for the fourth phase of a moon, the full moon.

The fifth phase of the moon is antÄ“ta, which also means “old” as in useless. The fifth phase goes from a waning gibbous moon to the last quarter.

anrūna

anruuna

anrūna

Since I mentioned the first phase of the moon yesterday, here is the word for the second phase. anrūna refers to the first sliver after a new moon. It is also the word used for anything that has come back into view after being obscured.

There are six phases of the moon in all. The third one covers the first quarter to a waxing crescent moon. The word for that is anmēλa, which also means “young“.

antāelle

antaaelle

antāelle

This word means “new” as in:

ñamma sarōña jatāelle tō jamēþa anmētti cī;
He had to make new eyes from tree resin.

which is a line from Dirk Elzinga’s Miapimoquitch text: Eye Juggler. The KÄ“len translation is here.

antāelle can also be used to refer to a phase of the moon – a new moon.

anrēli

anreeli

anrēli

We’re on the eighth sentence of the 14th Conlang Relay Text:

se jasāla mo mūrāni ma setenne anrēli anhēi;

anrÄ“li is the only unblogged word here, and it means “air”. The phrase anrÄ“li anhÄ“i “good air” is an idiomatic expression for “nice weather”. So:

“Give song for the winds that give us nice weather.”