ŋō

ngoo

ŋō

Line 9 of the KÄ“len Jabberwocky:

āniþ ēnne; āniþ ēnne; ñamma jatāŋŋi ŋō tō jēste jarūsīsse rā ma kiē;

(See Nov 7th’s post for an introduction.)

I blogged this word before, too, on March 2nd, 2011 as the number 140 octal, 96 decimal. The other meaning of this word is as an exaggerated many or very many. jatāŋŋi ŋō is therefore either 96 piercings (or cuts) or very many (hundreds of) piercings. jÄ“ste jarÅ«sÄ«sse is the instrument making the cuts. anrÅ«sÄ«sse is “back and forth”, as in swinging like a pendulum. And rā ma kiÄ“ means “through him/her/them”. So the swinging knife made very many piercings through him.

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;
to makīmaþālen masāknenūren to macūcū matū ñi ma rū ma pēxa cī;

il jahōλa ñamma masēnre maxōsa ā sāen japērnō jaλāten nīkamma sakū;
tō jāo sema jaþēλa mo sāen ma ñi maþārre matōrja sū jasātsātena tā;

il jīla þō ñi macāppacāe matāλisse rā xō rā jamēþena jaxēla kiē;
ānen sarōña janāola ñi jaxīra ñe ankālli ankālleni anūmi nā;

āniþ ēnne; āniþ ēnne; ñamma jatāŋŋi ŋō tō jēste jarūsīsse rā ma kiē;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed.
     The lost chicken-pigs make cough-cries!

Beware macāppacāe, its biting teeth, its many catching claws,
the frumious makīmaþālen, the macūcū bird
     Be away from them.

For 1/8th of a day, he searched for his enemy, a deadly blade in his hand.
Therefore, leaning and still, he thought under the jasātsātena.

At that moment, mercurial macāppacāe came to there through the dark woods.
With flaming eyes, he made a noise like very loud popping bubbles.

One, two. One, two. The swinging knife made very many piercings through him.

anniþen

annithen

anniþen

This is a clause-level modifier and it means “soon”.

Sentence #32:
tō jāo anniþen tema jēwāri anhāri nīkan antāoni nīkan anwūlīñi anlōi ē rūjāñ ew sūjīr mo sarōña;
So that soon he saw the waters of the lakes with waves with the golden sands around it but not at back.

janāra

janaara
janāra

This is either the singular form of the attribute annāra, which means everything that is, or a nominalized form of the modifier nāra, which means all of, the whole of. It is more likely the latter, as it means complete thing, whole thing.

Sentence #12:

tere jañūna janāra mo rirōña ē rā jāxīsse hūta pēxa ē rā jāxīsse tēsa pēxa;
You saw complete straightness to the horizon far to the right and to the horizon far to the left.

alxien

alxien

alxien

Sentence #10:

temle ien ē tere jamārwakie mo rirōña hi alxien ñi riēn rā xō;
He said to me: it was a surprising sight if you came to it suddenly.

alxien is another clause-level modifier, and refers to something unexpected by the speaker that happens. There are two other words, taxien and kexien. taxien refers to something that the speaker expects but doesn’t happen, and kexien refers to something the speaker expects that happens. I decided I didn’t need a word for something the speaker doesn’t expect that doesn’t happen. 🙂

illaniþ

illanith

illaniþ

Sentence #6:

te janaren ja temle ien illaniþ tema ien ñi sāen marō tō te jāo ewaþ tema jawōla to jaþīña illaniþ tema ien ñi sāen marō il tema jekīþa ien ē rēha la jalōna wījte jē nā rū xō rā annāmmi hi ñamma jatōna japōññe;
All he said to me: when first he perceived he was lost, because that it was even though he doubted his path, when first he perceived he was lost, he was certain that there were only three days from there to fresh water, if he found the road.

illaniþ is another clause-level modifier, and an il-word, meaning it has something to do with sequential time. In this case, the –aniþ part is related to the stem –ān– “one”. illaniþ refers to the first time, the beginning, the start.

jē nāra

jeespacenaara

jē nāra

Once upon a time I sort of translated (loosely!) Lord Dunsany’s story The King of Sarahb. I’ve used some of the sentences (and parts of sentences) of that story for previous posts. But, I think, I still have about one word per sentence that hasn’t been done. So, I will start on these, explaining the words at least. I probably will not go into detail about the sentences, but if you have a question about how a sentence works, comment!

First sentence:

temle ien il talōnti nā il ñi sāen rā sōssirja il antielen wā ñi rū xō jē nāra;
He said to me: It was many yesterdays ago when he came to Sōssirja, afterwards he never went from it.

jÄ“ nāra at the end of the sentence is a clause-level modifier, that is a word that says something about the whole clause. The clause in this case is ñi rÅ« xō which signifies a change in location from there. wā before the clause negates it, and jÄ“ nāra emphasizes that negation. It generally means “completely” or “wholly”, though “ever” might be a good translation, too.

Since it seems that I don’t have a word to blog in the next two sentences, here they are:

temle ien tō wā sema jatañēn to jakāe ja ñi sū japāŋŋien tō jāo ōrra ñi sāen rū āke;
He said to me: He did not like the doings in the homeland, so he went from there.

wā temle janahan nā ñe jāo;
He did not say to me more than this.

luhañen

luhanjen

luhañen

We’re still on sentence 19 of the LCC4 relay text:

ñamma jōrre ewaþ luhañen temme ke λi tānre ien sere jatañēn ien jāo kēñ;

luhañen is a clause-level modifier that denotes a continual or progressing action. Here it modifies the clause temme ke λi tānre ien sere jatañēn ien jāo kēñ “Tānre said, ‘Do you like this?'”. So, as she finished stabbing him and he finished going under the river’s water, Tānre continues to ask her a question. Weirdness!

And that brings us to sentence 20, which is the simple se jatōrren; or “The end.” The moral to this story, so far as there is one, is apparently not to accost strange women on the road.

And that brings us to the end of the relay texts. I haven’t gotten around to updating the others to the point where I can blog them. So, I need a new topic. Any suggestions?

jahē

jahee

jahē

Sentence 9 in the LCC4 relay text:

kexien jahē lā;

Despite the fact that it looks like a noun, the word jahÄ“ is another clause-level modifier. It is one of the several words for “yes” and it implies that this is as it should be. Combined with kexien and with the exclamatory marker lā, the woman is saying “Of course, yes (as it should be)!” and the combination of these three in this context implies sarcasm.

I have often wondered if there was a proper emoticon for sarcasm, and now think that maybe I should create one (or a word or a sentence construction) to convey it in KÄ“len. Though, on second thought, that might defeat the purpose of using sarcasm in the first place.

kexien

kexien

kexien

Sentence 9 in the LCC4 relay text:

kexien jahē lā;

Here is a three word sentence that is going to require two posts. 🙂

kexien is a clause level modifier that denotes that the speaker has expected whatever is in the clause. I usually translate it as “of course”, but “expectedly” is also correct. So the woman is signalling that she expected this sort of situation.

ōl

ool

ōl

On to the second sentence of the LCC4 relay text:

iēlte ñi macēna maxōλa rā jatōna nō sū jatāna ōl;

There’s not much to say here. iÄ“lte is “Once upon a time”, ñirā jatōna nō means that someone is going along a road; macÄ“na maxōλa “a pretty woman”, the object of ñi, is that someone who is going along the road; and sÅ« jatāna ōl means above or on top of the river.

I have talked about ōl before, in the context of rā and rÅ« phrases. It’s not much different in sÅ« phrases. While ōl means top, it can also mean up or above depending on context.

In any case, the phrase sū jatāna ōl modifies the whole sentence.

“Once upon a time a pretty woman was going along a road above the river.”