jahōλen

jahooljen

jahōλen

This refers to a time period of long duration. It is usually preceded by il.

Sentence #63:
ē anniþen ñi sawūrre jasōhi rū jamāonre sarāpa ī ñi sāen matāra il jahōλen ānen ansōha ānen anūri jūma ēmma;
The voices from the city of sarāpa soon became silent and he fell for a long time with silence except for the noise of the air.

Sentence #64:
ē ñi jēwār ē jaxēla ē jaxēla ī ē ñi sāen matāra āl;
The lake became dark and dark again as he fell.

Sentence #65:
anniþen ñi jaxēla janāra;
Soon it became complete darkness.

Sentence #66:
il ñi anlōki ī il ñi jēwār rūjapēxa ōrra il ñi sāen sū jasāma ī;
When it was light again, the lake had gone and he was in the desert again.

anniþen

annithen

anniþen

This is a clause-level modifier and it means “soon”.

Sentence #32:
tō jāo anniþen tema jēwāri anhāri nīkan antāoni nīkan anwūlīñi anlōi ē rūjāñ ew sūjīr mo sarōña;
So that soon he saw the waters of the lakes with waves with the golden sands around it but not at back.

illaniþ

illanith

illaniþ

Sentence #6:

te janaren ja temle ien illaniþ tema ien ñi sāen marō tō te jāo ewaþ tema jawōla to jaþīña illaniþ tema ien ñi sāen marō il tema jekīþa ien ē rēha la jalōna wījte jē nā rū xō rā annāmmi hi ñamma jatōna japōññe;
All he said to me: when first he perceived he was lost, because that it was even though he doubted his path, when first he perceived he was lost, he was certain that there were only three days from there to fresh water, if he found the road.

illaniþ is another clause-level modifier, and an il-word, meaning it has something to do with sequential time. In this case, the –aniþ part is related to the stem –ān– “one”. illaniþ refers to the first time, the beginning, the start.

jaraxēwa

jaraxeewa

jaraxēwa

This is another word for evening, and sometimes for dawn. More specifically it means twilight. This isn’t a formal division of the day. It can also refer to night, or rather the very beginning or the very end of night.

il ñi jaraxēwa il ñamma jaxōsa jōrre;
Night came, and he stopped searching.

jōrralon

joorralon

jōrralon

This is the fourth and last division of the day, covering from noon until sunset.

la jōrralon jālne cī;
Have a good afternoon.

I apparently don’t have words for “noon” or “midnight” or “sunrise” or “sunset”. I will have to think about that.

jānnalon

jaannalon

jānnalon

jānnalon is the morning, from sunrise until noon.

la jānnalon jālne cī;
Have a good morning.

The variant form ānnalon is also possible in il phrases.

il ānnalon ānen ancēxa wā il ñi sāen rā jatarūni jawēhi nō;
All morning without hope, he followed mirages.

jōrraxel

joorraxel

jōrraxel

The next division of the day is jōrraxel, which is midnight until sunrise.

la jōrraxel jālne cī;
Have a good night.

The corresponding il phrase is il jōrraxel or il ōrraxel. The difference is a matter of dialect, or maybe idiolect.

The words jānnaxel and jōrraxel are related to the word for night jaxāela, and the words jānne “beginning” and anōrre “end”

jānnaxel

jaannaxel

jānnaxel

Moons are generally visible at night, and this word refers to the time of night between sunset and midnight.

la jānnaxel jālne cī;
Have a good evening.

The phrase il jānnaxel (and sometimes il ānnaxel) means in or during the evening.

lānnāl

laannaal

lānnāl

We’re still on the fifteenth sentence of the 14th Conlang Relay Text:

sennete jālneha il jaliþa il lānnāl tēna ī;

and the next unblogged word we encounter lānnāl, which is a defective noun meaning “tomorrow”. It is always preceded by il since it is a time word. Here it is also modified by tÄ“na which modifies sets and means “all”, and then comes the modifier Ä«, which means “also”.

“We give them (the couple) good fortune today and all tomorrows also.”

The last sentence tomorrow!

jaliþa

jalitha

jaliþa

We’re still on the fifteenth sentence of the 14th Conlang Relay Text:

sennete jālneha il jaliþa il lānnāl tēna ī;

and the next unblogged word we encounter jaliþa, which means “today”. It is generally always preceded by il since it is a time word:

“We give them (the couple) good fortune today…”