antakīwa

antakiiwa

antakīwa

Let’s see. Before being interrupted by a tongue twister, I was talking about writing. So, antakīwa means “made of paper” and is related to the stem –kīw– “skin”. A piece of paper would be jatakīwa.

jatasēña

jataseenja

jatasēña

jatasēña is the word for warning. Here it is the object of setesse, which is se with a 3rd person paucal (or collective) source and a 3rd person plural beneficiary, so something like ‘they warn them’, with they being a cohesive group and them being multiple people. And ien, of course, renames the object of se.

setesse jatasēña ien sasēsse jasēsi jasēñi;
[se.tes.sĕ ja.ta.zeː.ɲə̆ jɛn sa.zeˑs.sĕ ja.zeː.zi ja.zeː.ɲi]

They warn them that their kidneys’ spots are dangerous.

jarūēl

jaruueel

jarūēl

This is the new word for ‘vowel’. In the phonology, I described vowels as a type of jasāorīke. ansāorīki anpōhi are the stops*, ansāorīki ankōrji the fricatives, ansāorīki antāni the sonorants, and ansāorīki anūrāni the vowels. While ansāorīki anūrāni is still one way to refer to vowels, the more common term is anrūēli for the set of vowels.

temme ē jaþēλi ien jakā ānen ansāorīki ien jaxūna ānen anrūēli ī xiēn jē jāxīsse jīlke ī jāo ja la sūjatā ē jāo sūjōl ien jiēxa ānen jasēsi ī jōrrisi ē jatatēn ien ñi jīlkena cē jaþārre ōrra ē jawāññerāñi jīþi nā ī;

So, the next ien phrase jaxūna ānen anrūēli is ‘pattern of vowels’. I should note that I am using ānen here as an instrumentative preposition. So, the pattern used by or made by vowels might be more accurate.

He said to him the ideas: the doings of consonants; the pattern of vowels, …

* While s is actually a fricative, it is classed with the stops, probably because it used to be an affricate ts.

jasāorīke

jasaaoriike

jasāorīke

This is the word for consonant. I used this word ages ago as a word for phoneme when describing Kēlen Phonology and Orthography. In the sentence, it is in the collective, denoting the whole set of consonants in the language.

temme ē jaþēλi ien jakā ānen ansāorīki ien jaxūna ānen anrūēli ī xiēn jē jāxīsse jīlke ī jāo ja la sūjatā ē jāo sūjōl ien jiēxa ānen jasēsi ī jōrrisi ē jatatēn ien ñi jīlkena cē jaþārre ōrra ē jawāññerāñi jīþi nā ī;

Regarding the sentence, temme is se in the past tense with a 3rd person singular source and a 3rd person singular beneficiary, or: He said to him; and jaþēλi is idea or thought. It has an ‘and’ (ē) before it, to coordinate with the ‘and’ (ē) before jatatēn later in the sentence. It’s in the plural because it is renamed multiple times. ien renames jaþēλa three times in the sentence. The first ien phrase is jakā ānen ansāorīki, the deeds or usage of consonants.

jatatēn

jatateen

jatatēn

This word refers to a reason or explanation. I am going to blog a few grammatical terms for the next week, and the reason I am doing so is this wonderful sentence I found in Lord Dunsany’s The Charwoman’s Shadow:

“He taught the use of consonants, the reason of vowels, the way of the downstrokes and the up; the time for capital letters, commas, and colons; and why the ‘j’ is dotted, with many another mystery.”

I turned this into a translation challenge on the conlang list. It’s not an easy one, since part of the challenge is to adapt it the particulars of the conlang’s writing system. My translation ended up being:

temme ē jaþēλi ien jakā ānen ansāorīki ien jaxūna ānen anrūēli ī xiēn jē jāxīsse jīlke ī jāo ja la sūjatā ē jāo sūjōl ien jiēxa ānen jasēsi ī jōrrisi ē jatatēn ien ñi jīlkena cē jaþārre ōrra ē jawāññerāñi jīþi nā ī;

and I will discuss the parts of it over the next week.

jahāhhe

jahaahhe

jahāhhe

This means ‘sigh’, as in to let out an audible breath. With all those h’s, it definitely sounds like one. 🙂

temme jahāhhe ien sele jahēŋŋūn mo lekōλa;
He sighed, I am thirsty.

mawēhēl

maweeheel

mawēhēl

Continuing on our theme, mawēhēl is a liar. This is essentially yesterday’s word with the suffix –ēl. Most words that end in –ēl refer to a person.

la sāen mawēhēl mawehē ma ñamma jawēhi;
“S/he is a lying liar who lies.”

jawēha

jaweeha

jawēha

jawēha refers to a false thing, which makes it the opposite of yesterday’s word.

ñarra jawēha lā;
“You lie!”