jatēnnīke

jateenniike

jatēnnīke

a ceremony of joining.

ñi jatēnnīke ja pa jakīren riēnne;
You (two) are joined to the clan.

Note: OK, on to emotions and such next.

mēlīña

meeliinja

mēlīña

grandchild, one’s daughter’s child, any small child of any gender in one’s clan. The green squares in the diagram are the purple circle’s mÄ“līñi.

eeliinj

mamōīñ

mamooiinj

mamōīñ

a person’s male child, a son of one’s cousins, any male child of the next generation. So, the green triangles in the diagram as related to the purple square:

mooiinj

malāca

malaaca

malāca

a person’s female child, a daughter of one’s cousins in the clan, any female child of the next generation in the clan. So the green circles in the diagram are the purple circle’s malāci.

laaca

mawēsaron

maweesaron

mawēsaron

one’s great uncle, one’s mother’s mother’s brother or husband, any male kin of one’s grandmother’s generation. Again, the green triangles in relation to the purple square:

weesaron

mārjanen

maarjanen

mārjanen

one’s grandmother, mother’s mother, great-aunt, any female kin of one’s mother’s mother’s generation. The green circles are the purple square’s mārjanni:

aarjanen

masōwa

masoowa

masōwa

one’s father. This can also include one’s father’s brothers, provided they all married into the clan. Since the KÄ“leni sometimes marry in sibling groups, this is not an uncommon occurrence. So, the green triangle’s are the purple square’s masōwi.

soowa