sakāca

sakaaca

sakāca

Line 3 of the Kēlen Jabberwocky:

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;

(See Nov 7th’s post for an introduction.)

Technically, I have blogged this word already. On February 8th, 2010 I defined this word to mean “one’s fingernails and toenails”. But this is actually the word jakāca which refers to an animal’s claws. It’s been transformed into an obligatorily possessed body part word because the claws belong to macāppacāe, an animate and volitional being.

sakāca jaþāla nā is (his) many catching claws. is actually there for two reasons: 1) to make the syllable count match the other lines, and 2) because each line ends with a syllable containing a long vowel. being a post-positional modifier is a very useful word. 🙂

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed.
     The lost chicken-pigs make cough-cries!

Beware macāppacāe, its biting teeth, its many catching claws.

jasūpa

jasuupa

jasūpa

Line 3 of the Kēlen Jabberwocky:

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;

(See Nov 7th’s post for an introduction.)

This is a real word, in the sense of being in the average Kēlen dictionary. All the previous words from this poem that I have blogged were made-up words. See Nov 7th’s post if that confuses you.

jasūpa is a bite. sapīra jasūpa are biting teeth. This phrase sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla was the first thing I came up with when contemplating this translation. Everything else grew around it.

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed.
     The lost chicken-pigs make cough-cries!

Beware macāppacāe, its biting teeth, …

anxōni

anxooni

anxōni

This is the word for memories. This sometimes appears as a possessed noun saxōna.

Sentence #35:
ē tema jāŋŋeren to jamāonre jalū sū jēwāri āñ ānen anlūi rū jasōþa wā mo sanārme ien ñe wā tema to anlūani to anexīmi to anxōni to ankīri mo sanārme aþ ñi sapāla sū anxūri hāl sū jēwāri nū;
The beauty from the city shining among the lakes with light from nowhere affected him like neither the stars nor music nor memory nor family had affected him and he wept in front of the gates beside the lakes.

anxōññāon

anxoonnjaaon

anxōññāon

This attribute refers to shape, namely something in the shape of a vein or artery. The possessed noun saxōññāon is the word for one’s veins and arteries, and the attribute is a derivation of this.

Sentence #34:
sū jēwāri āñ la jamāonre nīkan ankōnōri anlūŋŋiþi anrāēli nīkan antāñi ē ansīwa ñe anlōki il jaraxēwa ī jaxōññāoni jalōnni jatēñi;
Among the lakes was a city with towers of white marble with flushes of pink like sunlight at twilight and also thin veins of gold.

sasēsse

saseesse

sasēsse

So that tongue twister I mentioned earlier, it goes:

setesse jatasēña ien sasēsse jasēsi jasēñi;

Exercising my rusty IPA skillz: [se.tes.sĕ ja.ta.zeː.ɲə̆ jɛn sa.zeˑs.sĕ ja.zeː.zi ja.zeː.ɲi]

sasēsse is one’s kidney(s), and sasēsse jasēsi are one’s kidneys’ dots or spots.

sawēλa

saweelja

sawēλa

We’re still on the fourth sentence of the 18th Conlang Relay Text

sū jatāsa la jatēwa jaλāona jarōllōl ja sūjōl la macēna maranīsa masērre saŋē ē jawūña ē jāŋŋeren sawēλa jatāña janēūñ ñe anmāe;

sawēλa is a term for facial cheeks. The stem –wēλ– refers to curves. This word, like saŋē refers back to the woman. Tomorrow, we finish this sentence.

“In the market square is a wide, snow-covered table, on top of which is standing a well-dressed woman, her face contemptuous and beautiful, her cheeks….”

sahē

sahee

sahē

We’re on the tenth sentence of the 14th Conlang Relay Text

se jasāla mo anālnaren ja senne lihē jālte;

Again, “Give song” and “for joy” and “that gives us” and lihē which is the 1st person form of the obligatorily possessed noun sahē which refers to one’s health and well-being. Tomorrow we will discuss the last of this sentence.

samōra

samoora

samōra

The third line of the LCC3 Relay Text:

ñi nāra lemōra ñi antāoni antāλi rūjapēxa;

lemōra is the 1st person possessed form of samōra, “one’s dreams”. The first clause, ñi nāra lemōra is incomplete, “All my dreams (become something).” The second clause, the refrain, is again “the wild waves move away”. Putting these two clauses together usually requires some sort of conjunction or relative pronoun or both. As it is poetry, the juxtaposition of these two clauses leads one to interpret this line as “All my dreams become the wild waves moving away”.

la liēn sū anālhāri anālri jahāwa ñi antāoni anhūwi rūjapēxa;
la jāo pa anhē ja ñi antāoni antāλi rūjapēxa;
ñi nāra lemōra ñi antāoni antāλi rūjapēxa;

I am at the edge of the stormy sea and the breaking waves move away
This is good, that the wild waves move away
All my dreams become the wild waves moving away

Tomorrow, we start line 4.

jarāka

jaraaka

jarāka

This is the word for step – as in take a step. It is generally used with ñi and in the collective (a series of steps) as in:

ñamma anrāki rājanō;
She walked onwards.

Or more literally, he made a series of steps to [undefined location].

Kēlen does not have specific words for walk or run. Generally motion towards or away from something is expressed with the relational ñi in conjunction with either (towards) or (away) as in:

ñi sāen rājanō;
She went to it.

One can approximate ‘run’ with the phrase ānen antānre ‘with swiftness’ as in:

ñi sāen rājanō ānen antānre;
She went to it swiftly.

Since a step can be seen as a body expression, it can be possessed as in:

la sarāka jariēnneþa;
‘Her step is funny.’ or ‘She walks in a comical manner.’

The same is true of any other motions a body can make: inanimate singular or collective for general use, possessed when commenting on someone’s manner or style.