jēhe

jeehe

jēhe

We’re on the sixteenth and final sentence of the 14th Conlang Relay Text:

ñi þō jēhe cī;

and we get a few short words and the noun jÄ“he which means “truth”. The short words consist of the relational ñi and the exhortative marker cÄ« and the modifier þō. Put this all together and we have:

“Let this be truth.”

which is a speech act finalizing the ceremony.

lānnāl

laannaal

lānnāl

We’re still on the fifteenth sentence of the 14th Conlang Relay Text:

sennete jālneha il jaliþa il lānnāl tēna ī;

and the next unblogged word we encounter lānnāl, which is a defective noun meaning “tomorrow”. It is always preceded by il since it is a time word. Here it is also modified by tÄ“na which modifies sets and means “all”, and then comes the modifier Ä«, which means “also”.

“We give them (the couple) good fortune today and all tomorrows also.”

The last sentence tomorrow!

jaliþa

jalitha

jaliþa

We’re still on the fifteenth sentence of the 14th Conlang Relay Text:

sennete jālneha il jaliþa il lānnāl tēna ī;

and the next unblogged word we encounter jaliþa, which means “today”. It is generally always preceded by il since it is a time word:

“We give them (the couple) good fortune today…”

jālneha

jaalneha

jālneha

We’re on the fifteenth sentence of the 14th Conlang Relay Text:

sennete jālneha il jaliþa il lānnāl tēna ī;

and the first unblogged word we encounter jālneha, which means “good fortune”. It is the object of se inflected for a 1st person inclusive paucal source and a third person paucal beneficiary:

“We give them (the couple) good fortune…”

anrēha

anreeha

anrēha

We’re on the twelfth sentence of the 14th Conlang Relay Text:

sanna jasāla ien jaþīña ja senne to anrēha rā ancāna;

and the only unblogged word is anrÄ“ha, which refers to the future. So this sentence starts with se inflected for a 1st person inclusive paucal source and the object of se is the noun jasāla “song” so “We sing” and what we sing is jaþīña ja senne to anrÄ“ha rā ancāna, “the path that the future gives us” (since anrÄ“ha is not animate it does not trigger any inflection of se). Then comes the phrase rā ancāna “towards love”. This has to modify jaþīña “path”:

“We sing the path towards love that the future gives us.”

Since the next two sentences are very simple and have no new words in them, I will talk about them here:

semme jacāna ke macēna mo macūma;

se + 3rd person singular source and 3rd person singular beneficiary (not reflexive). The object of se is jacāna “love”. Then there’s an animate source phrase naming macÄ“na “the woman” as the source and a beneficiary phrase naming macÅ«ma “the man” as the beneficiary. So the thirteenth sentence translates as:

“The woman gives love to the man” or “The man feels love from the woman”. Take your pick.

The fourteenth sentence is the same with the source and beneficiary reversed:

semme jacāna ke macūma mo macēna;
“The man gives love to the woman” or “The woman feels love from the man”.

Tomorrow, the fifteenth sentence!

mērja

meerja

mērja

We’re still on the eleventh sentence of the 14th Conlang Relay Text:

āl ñanna lekū rājōl rā mērji ma setenne mīsien cī;

mērja is the word for deity, god, or spirit, and here it appears in the animate collective, so the translation is plural.

“Now we lift up our hands to the gods…”

mÄ“rji is followed by the animate relative pronoun ma and then the clause “they give us children” and then the mood marker cÄ« which makes everything an exhortation:

“Now let’s lift up our hands to the gods that give us children.”

āl

aal

āl

We’re now on the eleventh sentence of the 14th Conlang Relay Text:

āl ñanna lekū rājōl rā mērji ma setenne mīsien cī;

āl is an il word, a word that refers to time. In this case it is a tense/aspect modifier that emphasizes the present, and is usually translated as “now”.

As for the rest of the sentence, we have ñi inflected for a 1st person inclusive paucal agent. The object of ñi is lekÅ« “our hands” and then comes the locative phrase rājōl “to up”, so we have changed the location of our hands upwards: “Now we lift up our hands…” And then rā mÄ“rji “to mÄ“rji“, which I will explain tomorrow.

anālte

anaalte

anālte

We’re still on the tenth sentence of the 14th Conlang Relay Text

se jasāla mo anālnaren ja senne lihē jālte;

anālte is the last word of this sentence, and in inanimate singular modifying lihÄ“. anālte means “healthy, whole, well”. So again we have a somewhatly redundant phrase lihÄ“ jālte which might be translated as “health and well-being”.

“Give song for the joy that gives us health and well-being.”

sahē

sahee

sahē

We’re on the tenth sentence of the 14th Conlang Relay Text

se jasāla mo anālnaren ja senne lihē jālte;

Again, “Give song” and “for joy” and “that gives us” and lihÄ“ which is the 1st person form of the obligatorily possessed noun sahÄ“ which refers to one’s health and well-being. Tomorrow we will discuss the last of this sentence.

anxēwa

anxeewa

anxēwa

We’re still on the ninth sentence in the 14th Conlang Relay Text:

se jasāla mo jātaren ja senne jatāña jaxēwa;

and the last word is jaxÄ“wa, which is the inanimate singular (to modify jatāña) of the stative anxÄ“wa, which refers to the attribute of giving shade or casting shadows. jatāña jaxÄ“wa then really emphasizes the shade-giving qualities of the ātaren tree. I chose to translate this phrase as “shady shelter”.

“Give song for the ātaren tree that gives us shady shelter.”