anxēla

anxeela

anxēla

Speaking, of shadows, anxÄ“la is the word for dark or darkness. This word is the opposite of anlÅ«i or “light”. Darkness can be either stative or singular, but light is generally collective.

rā anxēla mē makkāontien
And in the darkness bind them

anniþen ñi jaxēla janāra;
Soon it became complete darkness.

anxēwi

anxeewi

anxēwi

This is the word for shadows or shade, and, yes, it is related to yesterday’s word.

sū jekiēn mōrtōr ja pa anxēwi;
In the land of Mordor where the shadows lie

anxūna

anxuuna

anxūna

We’re still on sentence 17 of the LCC4 relay text:

ñamma jēste rā λi tānre sakīwa kiē ānen anxūna;

anxÅ«na refers to a pattern and one characteristic of a pattern is that it repeats – so ānen anxÅ«na means “repeatedly”. So she pushed the knife through Tānre’s skin repeatedly. Poor Tānre.

jaxēxa

jaxeexa

jaxēxa

We’re on the third sentence of the 18th Conlang Relay Text

samma japēlti mo jaxēxi ja ē ñi jarewēλi ī ñi jahūwi ī ñi jasēþa ñe jawēlrienāl rū jatāsa λi xēþa āñ;

The tūmse is barking at jaxēxi, the plural of jaxēxa which means smoke as a countable thing, so a plume, puff, cloud or wisp of smoke. Otherwise, the word for smoke is the sensibly collective anxēxi. jaxēxi is followed by the relative pronoun ja and then a number of conjoined ñi clauses.

anxēwa

anxeewa

anxēwa

We’re still on the ninth sentence in the 14th Conlang Relay Text:

se jasāla mo jātaren ja senne jatāña jaxēwa;

and the last word is jaxÄ“wa, which is the inanimate singular (to modify jatāña) of the stative anxÄ“wa, which refers to the attribute of giving shade or casting shadows. jatāña jaxÄ“wa then really emphasizes the shade-giving qualities of the ātaren tree. I chose to translate this phrase as “shady shelter”.

“Give song for the ātaren tree that gives us shady shelter.”

anxālāe

anxaalaae

anxālāe

The next sentence in the 15th Conlang Relay Text:

ewaþ ñaxxa jajāra jaxālāe jatēnnen nā ñe janaren;

anxālāe appears here in the inanimate singular, modifying the word jajāra “dance”. anxālāe as an attribute refers to something as it should be, which would be “orderly, in harmony, balanced, fair”. As a modifier for “dance”, “in harmony” is probably the best pick.

jaxūna

jaxuuna

jaxūna

We’re on this sentence in the 15th Conlang Relay Text:

wā sexe jawālīke to jajāra jaxūna;

jaxÅ«na is related to jaxÅ«nÄ«ke. Where jaxÅ«nÄ«ke means “plan”, jaxÅ«na means “pattern”. The –Ä«ke suffix derives artificial nouns from natural ones. So, jaxÅ«na is a spontaneous or natural pattern that simply appears. jaxÅ«nÄ«ke is a deliberately made pattern or plan. I used jaxÅ«nÄ«ke in the original sentence, but I think jaxÅ«na fits better. A dance has a pattern by definition, so that is considered a natural pattern. Write it down or otherwise abstract it, and the pattern becomes a plan.

wā sexe jawālīke to jajāra jaxūna;
“They did not experience close observation of the pattern of the dance.” or
“They did not study the dance-pattern.”

jaxūnīke

jaxuuniike

jaxūnīke

The second sentence of the 15th Conlang Relay Text:

la sāeþ ānen jaxūnīki honahan wā;

jaxÅ«nÄ«ke means “plan” and is derived from jaxÅ«na which I will be blogging later as it also appears in this text. It appears here in the plural form.

xō

xoo

xō

The next sentence in the 17th Conlang Relay Text is:

ñamma jarāka rū xō ā macūma ānen antānre;

The only unfamiliar word is xō, which means “there, that place”. So this sentence translates to: “The man made steps from there with quickness” or “The man moved quickly away.”

xiēn jē

xieenspacejee

xiēn jē

This is a preposition meaning “about” or “concerning”.

la þō jatāena xiēn jē anþēŋŋeni;
This story is about an argument.

The titles of many short texts consist of xiÄ“n jÄ“ plus a noun phrase. For example, the title of the KÄ“leni version of the North Wind and the Sun is xiÄ“n jÄ“ anþēŋŋeni “Concerning an argument”.