jatarōñ

jataroonj

jatarōñ

This refers to something that one has anticipated or foreseen, so a prediction.

Sentence #23:

il ñi sāen marēwa il ē tema jahēŋŋūn nā ñe jatarōñ ja tema ōrra aþ tema jaxiēna ien ñamma jatōna japōññe anniþen hēja cī;
When he awoke, he was thirstier that he had foreseen and understood that he must immediately find the road.

antūtte

antuutte

antūtte

This refers to volition or to one’s will. So ānen antūtte is “willingly” and ānen antūtte wā is “unwillingly”.

Sentence #22:

il ñi jaraxēwa il ñamma jaxōsa jōrre ānen antūtte wā il aþ ñi sāen maxēie il tema jaxiēna ien il ñi jānnalon jānne il ñamma jatōna japōññe rēha;
Night came, and he stopped searching without willingness and went to sleep with the certainty that come morning he would find the road.

antēspe

anteespe

antēspe

This refers to something that is left over or remaining from something.

Sentence #11:

sū anjēlti anwīwi āñ alxien te jēta jatēspe to jampāenten to manahan sakēwīke;
In the middle of bare wilderness, this was unexpectedly a relic of civilization, of someone’s labor.

antakīwa

antakiiwa

antakīwa

Let’s see. Before being interrupted by a tongue twister, I was talking about writing. So, antakīwa means “made of paper” and is related to the stem –kīw– “skin”. A piece of paper would be jatakīwa.

jatasēña

jataseenja

jatasēña

jatasēña is the word for warning. Here it is the object of setesse, which is se with a 3rd person paucal (or collective) source and a 3rd person plural beneficiary, so something like ‘they warn them’, with they being a cohesive group and them being multiple people. And ien, of course, renames the object of se.

setesse jatasēña ien sasēsse jasēsi jasēñi;
[se.tes.sĕ ja.ta.zeː.ɲə̆ jɛn sa.zeˑs.sĕ ja.zeː.zi ja.zeː.ɲi]

They warn them that their kidneys’ spots are dangerous.

jatatēn

jatateen

jatatēn

This word refers to a reason or explanation. I am going to blog a few grammatical terms for the next week, and the reason I am doing so is this wonderful sentence I found in Lord Dunsany’s The Charwoman’s Shadow:

“He taught the use of consonants, the reason of vowels, the way of the downstrokes and the up; the time for capital letters, commas, and colons; and why the ‘j’ is dotted, with many another mystery.”

I turned this into a translation challenge on the conlang list. It’s not an easy one, since part of the challenge is to adapt it the particulars of the conlang’s writing system. My translation ended up being:

temme ē jaþēλi ien jakā ānen ansāorīki ien jaxūna ānen anrūēli ī xiēn jē jāxīsse jīlke ī jāo ja la sūjatā ē jāo sūjōl ien jiēxa ānen jasēsi ī jōrrisi ē jatatēn ien ñi jīlkena cē jaþārre ōrra ē jawāññerāñi jīþi nā ī;

and I will discuss the parts of it over the next week.

antēpa

anteepa

antēpa

Another synonym, this refers to no longer being filled with or having something that was there before. The singular form can refer to an emotion like loneliness. It is also featured in the phrase:

sele japīña to jatēpanrie;
I am sorry for your loss.

antēña

anteenja

antēña

antēña refers to something thin, long, and/or narrow. So jaxōññāoni jalōnni jatēñi is “thin veins of gold” as might appear in marble. It also refers to the sixth or last phase of the moon, the thin sliver or crescent before a new moon. I still do not know how many moons I have, but at least I have words for the phases. 🙂