jahōλa

jahoolja

jahōλa

Line 5 of the Kēlen Jabberwocky:

il jahōλa ñamma masēnre maxōsa ā sāen japērnō jaλāten nīkamma sakū;

(See Nov 7th’s post for an introduction.)

I haven’t done this word? Oh, I see, I did jahōλen which is the more general word for a long time. jahōλa has a more specific meaning of 1/8th of a day, which seems like a long time, I suppose.

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;
to makīmaþālen masāknenūren to macūcū matū ñi ma rū ma pēxa cī;

il jahōλa ñamma masēnre maxōsa ā sāen japērnō jaλāten nīkamma sakū;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed.
     The lost chicken-pigs make cough-cries!

Beware macāppacāe, its biting teeth, its many catching claws,
the frumious makīmaþālen, the macūcū bird
     Be away from them.

For 1/8th of a day…

jatū

jatuu

jatū

Line 4 of the Kēlen Jabberwocky:

to makīmaþālen masāknenūren to macūcū matū ñi ma rū ma pēxa cī;

(See Nov 7th’s post for an introduction.)

This is the word for bird, or flying thing really, since I hate birds and refuse to allow any on my planet. (Bats, on the other hand, are cool.) It’s been turned into an animate noun here, to match macūcū, and the assonance is not a coincidence. 🙂

ñi ma rū ma pēxa cī is “(one) be away from him/her/them”.

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;
to makīmaþālen masāknenūren to macūcū matū ñi ma rū ma pēxa cī;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed.
     The lost chicken-pigs make cough-cries!

Beware macāppacāe, its biting teeth, its many catching claws,
the frumious makīmaþālen, the macūcū bird
     Be away from them.

macūcū

macuucuu

macūcū

Line 4 of the Kēlen Jabberwocky:

to makīmaþālen masāknenūren to macūcū matū ma ñi rū ma pēxa cī;

(See Nov 7th’s post for an introduction.)

This is another nonsense word, with completely made-up nonsense syllables that alliterate with macāppacāe. It is also pronounced eerily like Jub Jub.

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;
to makīmaþālen masāknenūren to macūcū matū ma ñi rū ma pēxa cī;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed.
     The lost chicken-pigs make cough-cries!

Beware macāppacāe, its biting teeth, its many catching claws,
the frumious makīmaþālen, macūcū

makīmaþālen

makiimathaalen

makīmaþālen

Line 4 of the Kēlen Jabberwocky:

to makīmaþālen masāknenūren to macūcū matū ma ñi rū ma pēxa cī;

(See Nov 7th’s post for an introduction.)

This is another nonsense word, consisting of kīma ‘velociraptor wolves’ + þāl ‘catch’ + en. Again it is an animate volitional being, since its equivalent, the Bandersnatch, has a capital letter.

Amazingly enough, ansāknenūren is not a nonsense word. I blogged it on May 23rd, 2010. It means “explosively angry, fuming all the time, like a volcano (jasāka)”. The phrase to makīmaþālen masāknenūren is therefore “the frumious Bandersnatch”, and it is actually part of the sentence started in line 3.

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;
to makīmaþālen masāknenūren to macūcū matū ma ñi rū ma pēxa cī;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed.
     The lost chicken-pigs make cough-cries!

Beware macāppacāe, its biting teeth, its many catching claws,
the frumious makīmaþālen, …

sakāca

sakaaca

sakāca

Line 3 of the Kēlen Jabberwocky:

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;

(See Nov 7th’s post for an introduction.)

Technically, I have blogged this word already. On February 8th, 2010 I defined this word to mean “one’s fingernails and toenails”. But this is actually the word jakāca which refers to an animal’s claws. It’s been transformed into an obligatorily possessed body part word because the claws belong to macāppacāe, an animate and volitional being.

sakāca jaþāla nā is (his) many catching claws. is actually there for two reasons: 1) to make the syllable count match the other lines, and 2) because each line ends with a syllable containing a long vowel. being a post-positional modifier is a very useful word. 🙂

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed.
     The lost chicken-pigs make cough-cries!

Beware macāppacāe, its biting teeth, its many catching claws.

jasūpa

jasuupa

jasūpa

Line 3 of the Kēlen Jabberwocky:

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;

(See Nov 7th’s post for an introduction.)

This is a real word, in the sense of being in the average Kēlen dictionary. All the previous words from this poem that I have blogged were made-up words. See Nov 7th’s post if that confuses you.

jasūpa is a bite. sapīra jasūpa are biting teeth. This phrase sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla was the first thing I came up with when contemplating this translation. Everything else grew around it.

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed.
     The lost chicken-pigs make cough-cries!

Beware macāppacāe, its biting teeth, …

macāppacāe

macaappacaae

macāppacāe

Line 3 of the Kēlen Jabberwocky:

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;

(See Nov 7th’s post for an introduction.)

Beware macāppacāe – its jasūpa teeth, its many jaþāla claws.

macāppacāe is the Jabberwock. First, take a look at the word. ‘c’ and ‘p’ are the only Kēlen letters that lean over, and this word has two of each. Also, if you rotate one, you get the other, giving this word a topsy-turvy look.

cāppacāe = cāe ‘belly’ (or cāc ‘itch’ or cāh ‘fever’) + pac ‘wild animal’ + cāe again. Furthermore, it is animate, giving it the status of a volitional being, which is appropriate for a capitalized Monster and the subject of our poem.

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

sere jakewāla to macāppacāe sapīra jasūpa sakāca jaþāla nā;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed.
     The lost chicken-pigs make cough-cries!

Beware macāppacāe

jarōhāþa

jaroohaatha

jarōhāþa

Line 2 of the Kēlen Jabberwocky:

se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

(See Monday’s post for an introduction.)

The jarōhāþi make cough-cries!

jarōhāþa is a compound of ‘lost’ and hāþ, a small domesticated animal like a chicken or a pig. Lost chicken-pigs. Also the -hā- is alliterated with the -kāh- in the previous noun.

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed. The lost chicken-pigs make cough-cries!

japiēlkāha

japieekaaha

japiēlkāha

Line 2 of the Kēlen Jabberwocky:

se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

(See Monday’s post for an introduction.)

The jarōhāþi make japiēlkāhi!

japiēlkāhi is a compound of piēl ‘cry’ and kāh ‘cough’. (Compounding is not a usual Kēlen word-formation method.) This is the equivalent of outgrabe or outgribe.

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed. The jarōhāþi make cough-cries!

jatēññāntetūrāŋŋen

jaeennjaantetuuraanngen

jatēññāntetūrāŋŋen

Line 2 of the Kēlen Jabberwocky:

se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

(See Monday’s post for an introduction.)

anrāŋŋen means the quality of inducing a frown, the quality of being annoying. The singular form jarāŋŋen as the object of se therefore means “annoyed”. And who (or what) is annoyed? jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni.

jatēññāntetūrāŋŋen = tēñ ‘thin’ + ñānte ‘wing’ + ‘bird’ + rāŋŋen ‘annoyed’. (easily annoyed thin-winged birds) Or, maybe it is tēññ(ex) ‘conflicted’ + ānte ‘joy’ + ‘bird’ + rāŋŋe ‘spider’? (conflicted yet basically joyful bird-spiders) Or, tēn ‘all’ + ñānte ‘wing’ + tūr ‘injury’ + āŋŋen ‘pointy’? (all-winged pointy injury-causing things (living needles with wings, and they are annoyed! :twisted:))

Whichever you choose, it refers to “mimsy borogoves”.
(Then there’s double ññ and double ŋŋ in the same word!)

il ōrralon ñi jarewēλecāwāŋŋi ā jawēlrūlri rū jaxēwepōma āñ;
se jarāŋŋen mo jatēññāntetūrāŋŋeni; ñi japiēlkāhi tō jarōhāþi lā;

In the afternoon, the circular lizards did gyre and gimble around the shadow-stick.
The easily-annoyed thin-winged bird-spiders were annoyed. …