ōrū

ooruu

ōrū

You saw ōrÅ« in yesterday’s post. It means 100 in base 8, so 64 in base 10. An alternate form is ānoru which emphasizes the 1 in 100. The –Å« suffix is used several times in numbers and kinda sorta means “squared”. And since ōr is the stem for 10 (or 8 in decimal form), ōrÅ« is ōr squared.

ōraen

ooraen

ōraen

We’re on this sentence in the 17th Conlang Relay Text:

se jarūlōn to jakērþe ī ñi jakērþi ōraen rā xō;
The horse made a loud cry and then…ñi jakÄ“rþi ōraen rā xō;

ōraen is another number. It means 10,000 in base 8, which is 4096 in base ten, but really it’s not that exact, and “thousands” is a good translation. “and then thousands of horses went to there”. “came/went to there” is the literal translation, but “arrived” also works.

se jarūlōn to jakērþe ī ñi jakērþi ōraen rā xō;
The horse made a loud cry and then thousands of horses arrived.

ōrra

oorra

ōrra

We’re on sentence 6 of the Babel text:

il aþ ñi λi ārōn rā āke tō sema mo sarōña jamāonre nīkan jakōnōr ja ōrra ñatta;

ōrra is a past tense marker denoting completion.

“And then the Lord went there to see the city and the tower that they had built.”

jōl

jool

jōl

the top of something. This is related to the postpositional modifier ōl, which I blogged about earlier. That completes all the nouns in the fourth sentence of the Babel text.

ē teteñ ien hēja ñanna jamāonre nīkan jakōnōr ja ñi jōl rā anīstīli;

As for the rest, it should all be straightforward. The only word in there I haven’t mentioned before is ja.

ōl, rājōl, & rūjōl

ool

ōl

The modifier ōl refers to the top of something. This is related to the word sōlle ‘head’. Rā NP ōl is to the top of NP or over NP and rÅ« NP ōl is from the top of NP or from above NP.

raajool

rājōl

rājōl is rā NP ōl without a specified location, and so means ‘to the top’ or ‘over’.

ruujool

rūjōl

Likewise rÅ«jōl is rÅ« NP ōl without a specified location, and so means ‘from the top’ or ‘from above’.

sōrwe

soorwe

sōrwe

one’s leg or legs.

The upper and lower parts of the legs (and of the arms for that matter), are described using annō and anpēxa. So sōrwe janō is the upper leg or thigh, and sōrwe japēxa is the lower leg or calf. Likewise with satāka janō, the upper arm, and satāka japēxa, the lower arm or forearm. annō and anpēxa generally mean near and far respectively. In this usage, the point of reference is the torso (sasātten).