jōrrien

joorrien

jōrrien

This is the word for “west”, and as “east” is derived from a stem meaning “beginning, so “west” is derived from –ōrr– “end”.

anōmen

anoomen

anōmen

As an attribute, this means having greater than expected length. As an abstract concept, it means length.

Sentence #45:
ñatta jacēha ja ñatta sāen rā jaþīña nō rā jatēwa jōmen nīkan jacūteni jalōi sū jēwār kiē sū ankōnōri anlūñi tā;
They tried to make him go along a path to a long table with shining cups at the far side of the lake under the gleaming towers.

Sentence #46:
ñi sāen rū sāim pēxa rā jatarūni jawēhi jēwāri anhāri ī;
Again he went away from them to the waters of the mirage lakes.

jōrrisa

joorrisa

jōrrisa

This is the word for a punctuation mark, namely the end-of-sentence marker end. Two of these make an end-of-section or end-of-passage mark.

temme ē jaþēλi ien jakā ānen ansāorīki ien jaxūna ānen anrūēli ī xiēn jē jāxīsse jīlke ī jāo ja la sūjatā ē jāo sūjōl ien jiēxa ānen jasēsi ī jōrrisi ē jatatēn ien ñi jīlkena cē jaþārre ōrra ē jawāññerāñi jīþi nā ī;

He said to him the ideas: the doings of consonants; the pattern of vowels, and also concerning the writing line and that which is beneath it and that above it; the usefulness of dots and end-marks; and the reason …

jōrralon

joorralon

jōrralon

This is the fourth and last division of the day, covering from noon until sunset.

la jōrralon jālne cī;
Have a good afternoon.

I apparently don’t have words for “noon” or “midnight” or “sunrise” or “sunset”. I will have to think about that.

jōrraxel

joorraxel

jōrraxel

The next division of the day is jōrraxel, which is midnight until sunrise.

la jōrraxel jālne cī;
Have a good night.

The corresponding il phrase is il jōrraxel or il ōrraxel. The difference is a matter of dialect, or maybe idiolect.

The words jānnaxel and jōrraxel are related to the word for night jaxāela, and the words jānne “beginning” and anōrre “end”

anōrre

anoorre

anōrre

On to sentence 19 of the LCC4 relay text:

ñamma jōrre ewaþ luhañen temme ke λi tānre ien sere jatañēn ien jāo kēñ;

jōrre is the inanimate singular form of anōrre, which refers to something that has stopped. The word is singular here because it is referring to the woman’s specific action of stabbing poor Tānre. So, ñamma jōrre is “She made it stop” or “She stopped (it)”. I’ll do the second clause tomorrow.

ōl

ool

ōl

On to the second sentence of the LCC4 relay text:

iēlte ñi macēna maxōλa rā jatōna nō sū jatāna ōl;

There’s not much to say here. iÄ“lte is “Once upon a time”, ñirā jatōna nō means that someone is going along a road; macÄ“na maxōλa “a pretty woman”, the object of ñi, is that someone who is going along the road; and sÅ« jatāna ōl means above or on top of the river.

I have talked about ōl before, in the context of rā and rÅ« phrases. It’s not much different in sÅ« phrases. While ōl means top, it can also mean up or above depending on context.

In any case, the phrase sū jatāna ōl modifies the whole sentence.

“Once upon a time a pretty woman was going along a road above the river.”