anñiñēka

annjinjeeka

anñiñēka

This refers to the feeling of eagerness. ānen anñiñēka would be “eagerly”.

Sentence #38:
ē tema jamārwakie aþ ānen anñiñēka tetme jatēmmēri aþ ānen ankewāla ñi sāen rā sāim rā anxūrimma;
He was amazed, and they called to him with eagerness, and with caution, he went to them, to their gates.

anñāntiwa

annjaantiwa

anñāntiwa

This refers to the quality of being mixed together. Since it is generally an attribute of more than one thing or substance, it often appears in the collective.

Sentence #33:
la anlāji anēkki ansīñi ankīþi sūjīr nīkan ankēji anñāntiwi tō tūaþ ñi ankeþāwi tō þō tō anmārwi;
There at the back were tall rocky red-brown mountains and sky mixed up together so that here and the world were divided.

jañūna

janjuuna

jañūna

Sentence #8:

te ien la jaxūna pa anwōra sū jasāma jamāxxānwe jawīwa ōl sū jañūna ēnne jakōna āñ;
It seemed to be a pattern of emptiness on top of the bare wide plain of the desert between two lines of pebbles.

jañūna is a line, a straight line.

Sentence #9:

tō jāo ñi jatōna tō ñi jaxūna tō jāo;
Because of this there was a road, from the pattern made by this.

anñāka

annjaaka

anñāka 

The next sentence in the 17th Conlang Relay Text is:

ē ñi jakērþe rū macūma pēxa ī ñi sāen mañāka;

Again, mostly straightforward. “And the horse moved away from the man, and then he (the man) became” mañāka. mañāka is the animate singular form of the attribute anñāka, which means “attacked”. That makes this sentence “And the horse moved away from the man, and then he (the man) became attacked” or “And the horse moved away from the man and then attacked him.”

anñicālte

annjicaalte

anñicālte

The seventh sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

ñalta jahōhhe jahē tō ja ñalta jañicālte sū jahāwekien;

anñicālte is the word for “traded” or “something for trading”. So, this sentence is “we make good cooked food” followed by the instrument-marker tō followed by a relative pronoun ja followed by the ñi clause “we make trade” followed by the locative phrase sÅ« jahāwekien “at the shore”. Put that all together and we get:

ñalta jahōhhe jahē tō ja ñalta jañicālte sū jahāwekien;
We make good cooked food from that which we trade at the shore.

ñēim

njeeim

ñēim

The next part of the fifth sentence of the Babel text:

ē teteñ ien hēja ñanna lewēra tō tūaþ wā ñi ñēim makkepōlien rā anmārwi āñ pēxa;

consists of ñi ñēim makkepōlien. ñēim is the first person inclusive paucal pronoun. The relational ñi is not inflected to match, so “we” cannot be the agent. However, ñi plus rā as a change in location does not generally inflect either. “I went home” is ñi liÄ“n rāmāra. Inflecting ñi as in ñalla liÄ“n rāmāra is “I made myself go home” and implies that I was unwilling to go home or did not choose to go home but was forced to anyway.

ñe

nje

ñe

is a comparative. By itself it expresses an inexact equivalence. So jacālmi ñe jakīþi is “bricks as stones” and ancÄ“wri ñe anhÄ“rmi “mud as mortar”, meaning here that the one substance is used in place of the other.

ē teteñ ien
hēja ñanna jacālmi jajūti nā
aþ te sāim nīkan jacālmi ñe jakīþi
aþ te sāim nīkan ancēwri ñe anhērmi;

And they to each other (said)
we should make many baked bricks
and te they with bricks as stones
and te they with mud as mortar

anñēīki

annjeeiiki

anñēīki

agreement, again in the collective because it is a complex thing involving multiple parts.

This word is in the fifth sentence of the North Wind and the Sun. The fifth sentence looks complicated, but really it isn’t.

teteñ anñēīki ien la ma pa antāken anānexa ma ñamma jalūra rū marāona pēxa cēja;

teteñ means “they, to each other”, anñēīki means agreement, ien renames the agreement as la ma pa antāken anānexa ma ñamma jalÅ«ra rÅ« marāona pÄ“xa cÄ“ja.

la ma pa antāken anānexa is “(the one) who has the most strength” and ma is a relative pronoun modifying this phrase. That leaves ñamma jalÅ«ra rÅ« marāona pÄ“xa cÄ“ja.

ñamma plus rÅ« denote a change in location of the object of ñi, namely jalÅ«ra or “cloak”, as caused by a third person agent. rÅ« marāona pÄ“xa means the change in location is away from marāona “wanderer. And cÄ“ja… Well, we’ll do cÄ“ja tomorrow, since it is a word I haven’t done yet.

ñi

nji

ñi

ñi is one of the relationals. It denotes an object that has changed its state or location. ñi is often inflected for animate agent.

In the North Wind and the Sun, sentence four reads:

il aþ ñi marāona nīkamma jalūra jacālle rājanō;

We discussed marāona nÄ«kamma jalÅ«ra jacālle yesterday. ñi plus rājanō (“along“) denotes the change in location of our wanderer with a warm cloak. Namely, that s/he is in motion along a path that leads to our protagonists.