majāra

majaara

majāra

The first sentence of the 15th Conlang Relay Text:

sere majjārien mo ritākken cī;

majjārien is the plural of the animate noun majāra which means “one who dances|is dancing”, “dancer”. The relational se here is inflected for a second person singular experiencer, so this sentence is addressed to you, the reader or listener. What you are experiencing is the dancers, what you are experiencing with, ritākken, will be discussed tomorrow, and the cÄ« at the end there makes this whole sentence a polite suggestion.

jē nā

jeespacenaa

jē nā

Final post on sentence 7 and on the LCC2 Relay Text, concerning the talking rock.

ilwae sele jarūna wā mo lerōña to jakīþa jatēnnā jē nā;

jÄ“ nā is a modifier that can be a noun phrase modifier or a clausal modifier. Either way it conveys a meaning of “only”. In this sentence, combined with ilwae it adds emphasis so that ilwaejÄ“ nā is “never at all” with an implied again.

ilwae sele jarūna wā mo lerōña to jakīþa jatēnnā jē nā;
I never had another sight of the talking rock at all.

ja

ja

ja

We’re still on sentence 6 of the LCC2 Relay Text, concerning a talking rock:

tō tele janūra to makīþa matēnnā jerrasōr tō jāo ñalla ja rā anālhāri mē ānen antāken;

ja is the 3rd person inanimate reduced pronoun. There is no full pronoun for 3rd person inanimate. This form of ja looks exactly like the much more common inanimate relative pronoun ja . The reason it can’t be that ja is that there is no noun phrase in front of it.

The use of ja here initially looks ungrammatical because it refers to makīþa matēnnā, an animate noun phrase. And, indeed, ma would be entirely appropriate here. But, remember I talked about raising things to animacy and imbuing them with personhood. The opposite is also possible and one can interpret this as lowering the talking rock back into inanimate object status. And considering the rest of the clause and the next sentence, that is what is happening here.

ñalla ja rā anālhāri mÄ“ is “I moved it into the ocean” signalling a change in location for the talking rock.

The talking rock’s reply made me angry that I moved it into the ocean…”

jalā

jalaa

jalā

This looks like a noun, but it isn’t. In the third sentence of the LCC2 Relay Text, concerning a talking rock, it occurs between a relative pronoun ien and the relational la. The only things that can occur in this position are conjunctions, clause-level modifiers, and peripheral phrases headed by some sort of prepositional particle. jalā functions as a clause-level modifier and indicates complete agreement with the statement one is responding to.

temle ke makīþa matēnnā ien jalā la liēn makīþa matēnnā;
The talking rock said to me, “Yes, I am a talking rock.”

Notice that the talking rock does not use the reduced first person pronoun.

janahan

janahan

janahan

On to sentence eight of the Babel text:

il tamma ien rēha ñatta janahan ja se jaþēŋŋe jacē lā;

The unfamiliar words are janahan, jaþēŋŋe, and lā.

janahan is an indefinite pronoun meaning “something” or “anything”.

“Then he said, they will make anything that …”

jāo

jaao

jāo

Still on the seventh sentence of the Babel text:

il tamma ien ē pa mēli anānīke ī pa sāim antaxōni ān tēna ī la ankāe ancēji ja ñatta rēha pa jāo jānne;

jāo is an abstract pronoun or rather a pronoun that refers to an abstraction. In this sentence jāo refers to pa mÄ“li anānÄ«ke Ä« pa sāim antaxōni ān tÄ“na and not to ankāe ancÄ“ji ja ñatta rÄ“ha as one might think. jāo can’t refer to ankāe ancÄ“ji ja ñatta rÄ“ha because the entire pa clause pa jāo jānne refers to it already.

ja

ja

ja

This is a relative pronoun that relativizes inanimates. In the fourth sentence of the Babel text

ē teteñ ien hēja ñanna jamāonre nīkan jakōnōr ja ñi jōl rā anīstīli;

ja relativizes jakōnōr. ñi jōl rā anÄ«stÄ«li is “make the top of it to heaven” and it is jakōnōr “a tower”.

And they to each other said: We should make a city with a tower whose top is to heaven.