jajūna

jajuuna

jajūna

This is the word for the center of a delimited space. So, jawÄ“lre jajÅ«na is the center of a cirle. There is also the word sajÅ«na which refers to one’s soul or one’s personhood. This comes from a different tradition than the more formal word senārre. This word is also the source of the suffix –iÅ«na or –jÅ«n, which commonly appears in names.

jē sōta ñe

jeespacesootaspacenjee

jē sōta ñe

This means “instead of” or “in place of”. It consists of the versatile preposition jÄ“ plus a defective noun related to the stem –sōþ– (seen in jasōþa “place”) plus the comparative ñe.

Sentence #42:
ñi sāen rā jatarūna jawēha jēwāri anhāri tō tema jakīña ien ñi jahēŋŋūn jakewōra jē sōta ñe ñi sāen rā jāllōhen;
He went to the waters of the mirage lakes, for he wished to quench his thirst rather than go to the feast.

jē nāra

jeespacenaara

jē nāra

Once upon a time I sort of translated (loosely!) Lord Dunsany’s story The King of Sarahb. I’ve used some of the sentences (and parts of sentences) of that story for previous posts. But, I think, I still have about one word per sentence that hasn’t been done. So, I will start on these, explaining the words at least. I probably will not go into detail about the sentences, but if you have a question about how a sentence works, comment!

First sentence:

temle ien il talōnti nā il ñi sāen rā sōssirja il antielen wā ñi rū xō jē nāra;
He said to me: It was many yesterdays ago when he came to Sōssirja, afterwards he never went from it.

jÄ“ nāra at the end of the sentence is a clause-level modifier, that is a word that says something about the whole clause. The clause in this case is ñi rÅ« xō which signifies a change in location from there. wā before the clause negates it, and jÄ“ nāra emphasizes that negation. It generally means “completely” or “wholly”, though “ever” might be a good translation, too.

Since it seems that I don’t have a word to blog in the next two sentences, here they are:

temle ien tō wā sema jatañēn to jakāe ja ñi sū japāŋŋien tō jāo ōrra ñi sāen rū āke;
He said to me: He did not like the doings in the homeland, so he went from there.

wā temle janahan nā ñe jāo;
He did not say to me more than this.

anjēlti

anjeelti

anjēlti

This is another word for ground or land, specifically wild and uncultivated land.

sū anjēlti anwīwi āñ alxien te jēta jatēspe to jampāenten to manahan sakēwīke;
In the middle of bare wilderness, this was unexpectedly a relic of civilization, of someone’s labor.

jajēra

jajeera

jajēra

I mentioned yesterday that I hadn’t blogged this word, so here it is. jajÄ“ra means a game. jajÄ“ri ja ñatta ā mÄ“li is “games (that) people play”, as in:

tema jajēra mo sarōña ien ñatta ā mīsi;
He saw the game that the children were playing.

This word is related to the word anjÄ“ren “playful”.

jahē

jahee

jahē

Sentence 9 in the LCC4 relay text:

kexien jahē lā;

Despite the fact that it looks like a noun, the word jahÄ“ is another clause-level modifier. It is one of the several words for “yes” and it implies that this is as it should be. Combined with kexien and with the exclamatory marker lā, the woman is saying “Of course, yes (as it should be)!” and the combination of these three in this context implies sarcasm.

I have often wondered if there was a proper emoticon for sarcasm, and now think that maybe I should create one (or a word or a sentence construction) to convey it in KÄ“len. Though, on second thought, that might defeat the purpose of using sarcasm in the first place.

anjēren

anjeeren

anjēren

Now for the sixth and final sentence of the 18th Conlang Relay Text:

ā macēna nīkamma sālne jajēren jē nā ñamma sū ma hāl jalāmīke jalūnte rājatā;

This sentence has an unusual structure in that the ā phrase modifying the relational ñi (inflected for 3rd person singular) is in front of the relational instead of trailing at the end as usual. An ā phrase names an agent for the change of state indicated by ñi, and ñi is inflected to match. The ā phrase is ā macÄ“na nÄ«kamma sālne jajÄ“ren jÄ“ nā. The first word after ā is macÄ“na “woman”, and then comes nÄ«kamma which is an associative preposition and a bit redundant since the next word is the obligatorily possessed sālne “smile”. The smile is described as jajÄ“ren, the inanimate singular form of anjÄ“ren meaning “having to do with games or play, playful”. The phrase is finished with the modifier jÄ“ nā “merely, just”, which is likely what triggered the inclusion of the redundant nÄ«kamma. So the whole phrase translates as “The woman with only a playful smile…”

jē

jee

jē

We’re on the fifth sentence of the 14th Conlang Relay Text:

se jalāña mo jakō ja senne jakecōna jē anpīña;

I’ve blogged all of these words except for the last two.

jÄ“ is one of those prepositions I don’t have a proper definition for or description of. In this context, it generally has something to do with opposition, most of the time anyways.

janaren

janaren

janaren

We’re on this sentence in the 15th Conlang Relay Text:

ewaþ ñaxxa jajāra jaxālāe jatēnnen nā ñe janaren;

janaren is an indefinite pronoun meaning “everything”. The full phrase nā ñe janaren is literally “more than everything” and means “most [of all]”. So jajāra jaxālāe jatÄ“nnen nā ñe janaren is “the most graceful and harmonious dance of all”. And ewaþ ñaxxa is “Yet they make”.

“Yet they make the most graceful and harmonious dance of all.”

No change really from this sentence in the original.