ī

ii

ī

The fourth line of the LCC3 Relay Text:

se jīxōsa cī ānen anwālte annāra il anpēxeni ī ñi rūjapēxa;

ī is one of those particles that can mean several things. As a conjunction, it means “and also”. As a clause-level modifier, it means “again, also”. If this is the conjunction ī then this sentence has to mean, “Let’s passionately look back in final moments and also (they) move away.” Hmm. If this is the clause-level modifier ī, then the sentence can mean “Let’s passionately look back again in final moments (as) (they) move away.” if ī is modifying the first clause, or “Let’s passionately look back (as) the final (waves) again move away.” if ī is modifying the second clause. Personally, I like the last interpretation, but they are all valid.

la liēn sū anālhāri anālri jahāwa ñi antāoni anhūwi rūjapēxa;
la jāo pa anhē ja ñi antāoni antāλi rūjapēxa;
ñi nāra lemōra ñi antāoni antāλi rūjapēxa;
se jīxōsa cī ānen anwālte annāra il anpēxeni ī ñi rūjapēxa;

I am at the edge of the stormy sea and the breaking waves move away.
This is good, that the wild waves move away.
All my dreams become the wild waves moving away.
Let’s passionately look back as the final waves again move away.

jīxōsa

jiixoosa

jīxōsa

The fourth line of the LCC3 Relay Text:

se jīxōsa cī ānen anwālte annāra il anpēxeni ī ñi rūjapēxa;

jīxōsa means “a second look at someplace or in some direction because one is searching for something”. As the object of an uninflected se followed by the mood marker , this clause implies “Let’s look back” or “Let’s look again”. does not actually belong here. It would belong at the end of the whole sentence, but this is poetry. here makes it ambiguous as to which clause (this one or the truncated refrain, “(they) move away”) the phrases ānen anwālte annāra, il anpēxeni, and ī belong to.

ānen anwālte annāra is composed of familiar words and means “with strong emotion” or “passionately”. So, are we passionately looking back or passionately moving away. Neither clause has an overtly animate participant capable of experiencing anwālte, though since the first line of the poem does contain a first person singular pronoun, and the refrain generally refers to waves, we can mostly assume that ānen anwālte annāra should be parsed with the first clause and its unspoken experiencer rather than with the second.

Tomorrow il anpēxeni.

la liēn sū anālhāri anālri jahāwa ñi antāoni anhūwi rūjapēxa;
la jāo pa anhē ja ñi antāoni antāλi rūjapēxa;
ñi nāra lemōra ñi antāoni antāλi rūjapēxa;
se jīxōsa cī ānen anwālte annāra il anpēxeni ī ñi rūjapēxa;

I am at the edge of the stormy sea and the breaking waves move away.
This is good, that the wild waves move away.
All my dreams become the wild waves moving away.
Let’s passionately look back … moving away.

jīstelon

jiistelon

jīstelon

anniversary. jamōla jīstelon would be birth-anniversary or birthday.

il jaliþa la ja-“blog” jīstelon;
Today is the blog anniversary.

I started this blog Oct 27, 2009. It’s been one year. I’m somewhat surprised I made it this far.

anīstīli

aniistiili

anīstīli

This is the other word for sky, and specifically refers to the night-time sky full of stars. It implies poetry and wonder.

ē teteñ ien hēja ñanna jamāonre nīkan jakōnōr ja ñi jōl rā anīstīli;
And they said to each other: We should make a city with a tower that reaches to the heavens.

la sahēññe jāste ñe anīstīli;
His hair was as dark as night.

anān & anīþa

anaan

anān

one, the one.

aniitha

anīþa

other, the other.

These occur together in the third clause of the Kēlen rephrasal of the 1st article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The expression, in full, is ke mān mo mīþa. ke is the particle used with SE to indicate an animate source and mo is used with SE to indicate a beneficiary. The relational SE in this clause is inflected with -enneñ, which is a 1st person paucal reflexive form. So ke mān mo mīþa expands on that as ‘from one to the other’ and is a formal way to say ‘one another’. And the clause senneñ anēla anciēri ke mān mo mīþa thus means ‘we give to one another the courtesies of personhood’.

That completes almost all of the third clause, which will be completed tomorrow. The fourth clause is subordinate to the third clause, and starts with the particle ien, which is used with SE to rename or elaborate on the object of SE. In the third clause the object of SE is anēla anciēri, those ‘courtesies of personhood’, so the fourth clause describes those. The description is straightforward in that I’ve already discussed maþūskīri, which means ‘weft-kin’. In this context, distant kin might also be a good translation. So, mo maþūskīri ‘to weft-kin’ and mo sāim maþūskīriēma ‘to their weft-kin’. SE in the subordinate fourth clause is correspondingly inflected for 3rd person plural, referring to both of these groups. So, senneñ anēla anciēri ke mān mo mīþa ien sexe mo maþūskīrimo sāim maþūskīriēma ‘We give to one another the courtesies of personhood that are given to weft-kin and to their weft-kin.’

Our progress:
tō la mēli manaren tēna ñe anhēnārīki anīλi jañāona jañēie
‘Because each person is an equal thread in the cloth of society…’
tō pa ñēim tēna ē lenārre ē lewēren
‘Because we each of us have soul and identity…’
tō jāo hēja senneñ anēla anciēri ke mān mo mīþa
ien sexe mo maþūskīri mo sāim maþūskīriēma cī;

anīλa

aniilja

anīλa

made of cloth.

This word is in the Kēlen rephrasal of the 1st article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights due to a cultural metaphor of society as a piece of woven cloth. Originally, the metaphor included the idea of one’s kin in the clan being the up and down threads (the warp) and one’s paternal out-clan kin as being the side to side threads (the weft). A more modern interpretation has one’s kin as the warp and one’s other connections (colleagues, friends, acquaintances) as the weft. In the rephrasal, anīλa modifies anhēnārīki ‘society’, and is therefore in the collective. So, the phrase anhēnārīki anīλi refers to society as a piece of cloth, or ‘the cloth of society’.

Our progress:
la mēli manaren tēna ñe anhēnārīki anīλi jañāona jañēie
pa ñēim tēna ē lenārre ē lewēren
tō jāo hēja senneñ anēla anciēri ke mān mo mīþa
ien sexe mo maþūskīri mo sāim maþūskīriēma cī;

īr, rājīr, & rūjīr

iir

īr

The modifier īr refers to the back of something. This is the same root as sīra. So, NP īr is to the back of NP or to behind NP and NP īr is from the back of NP or from behind NP.

raajiir

rājīr

rājīr is NP īr without a specified location, and so means ‘to the back’.

ruujiir

rūjīr

Likewise rūjīr is NP īr without a specified location, and so means ‘from the back’ or ‘from behind’.