sahē

sahee

sahē

We’re on the tenth sentence of the 14th Conlang Relay Text

se jasāla mo anālnaren ja senne lihē jālte;

Again, “Give song” and “for joy” and “that gives us” and lihÄ“ which is the 1st person form of the obligatorily possessed noun sahÄ“ which refers to one’s health and well-being. Tomorrow we will discuss the last of this sentence.

hōkēñ

hookeenj

hōkēñ

We’re on this sentence of the 15th Conlang Relay Text:

ñaxxa jāŋŋeren nā ā majjārien ānen ankēwīke pē hōkēñ;

hōkēñ is a combination of the prefix hō and the mood marker kēñ. kēñ has been blogged before as the mood marker governing questions. Being prefixed with hō makes the question a “how” question. So, “How do the dancers make much beauty with little effort?”. This sentence is unchanged from the original.

Tomorrow, the final sentence!

honahan

honahan

honahan

The second sentence of the 15th Conlang Relay Text:

la sāeþ ānen jaxūnīki honahan wā;

honahan is an indefinite pronoun meaning “any kind” or “any manner”. When it modifies a noun, it means “any kind|manner of” noun, and the noun needs to be plural – so jaxÅ«nÄ«ki honahan: of all the plans, any kind or manner of them. And ānen jaxÅ«nÄ«ki honahan wā “without any kind of plan”, and the full sentence: “They are without any kind of plan.” This sentence is unchanged from the original.

anhōhhe

anhoohhe

anhōhhe

The seventh sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

ñalta jahōhhe jahē tō ja ñalta jañicālte sū jahāwekien;

anhōhhe is a stative noun meaning “cooked or otherwise prepared for eating” and is used to describe food. In the sentence, jahōhhe is in the inanimate singular does not modify anything in the sentence. This construction is rather common, actually, and so jahōhhe is “something cooked or otherwise prepared for eating” or “cooked food”. It is further modified by anhÄ“, “good” so jahōhhe jahÄ“ is “good cooked food”. ñalta says that a 1st person exclusive plural entity is the agent or cause of that good food, and the tō phrase further elaborates a second cause. More on that tomorrow.

anhēīñi

anheeiinji

anhēīñi

The fourth sentence of the 2nd Inverse Relay text:

la liēþ sū anhēīñi;

la liēþ sÅ« is an easy “We are at…”. anhēīñi refers to an expanse of a plant that acts as a ground cover and has a sweet smell. It is also native to TÄ“rjemar.

la liēþ sū anhēīñi;
We are at a field of anhēīñi

anhūwa

anhuuwa

anhūwa

Still on the first line of the LCC3 Relay Text:

la liēn sū anālhāri anālri jahāwa ñi antāoni anhūwi rūjapēxa;

anhÅ«wa means “broken into pieces” and in this line it modifies antāoni “waves”. antāoni anhÅ«wi is “the breaking waves” and ñi antāoni anhÅ«wi rÅ«japÄ“xa is “the breaking waves move away”. The phrase ñi antāoni anhÅ«wi rÅ«japÄ“xa really ought to be its own sentence, but since this is poetry, it is simply glommed on to the previous clause in a way that assumes an “and”.

la liēn sū anālhāri anālri jahāwa ñi antāoni anhūwi rūjapēxa;
I am at the edge of the stormy sea and the breaking waves move away.

jahāwa

jahaawa

jahāwa

Line 1 of the LCC3 Relay Text:

la liēn sū anālhāri anālri jahāwa ñi antāoni anhūwi rūjapēxa;

jahāwa means “the end or edge of something”. Coming as it does after the phrase anālhāri anālri “stormy sea”, it refers to the edge of the stormy sea. The entire phrase anālhāri anālri jahāwa is the object of the preposition sÅ«, which indicates a location. la liÄ“n sÅ« anālhāri anālri jahāwa “I am at the edge of the stormy sea”.

anhūwīke

anhuuwiike

anhūwīke

Sentence ten of the Babel text:

ē ñamma jāo ā λi ārōn ī ñamma sāim makkepōlien rā anmārwi āñ pēxa ī sū jamāonre ñamma jalāīke jahūwīke;

As mentioned yesterday, stative nouns take the inflection of the noun they modify. Here anhÅ«wÄ«ke is modifying jalāīke “the building of [something inanimate and singular]”. anhÅ«wÄ«ke means “deliberately ended or broken” and so jalāīke jahÅ«wÄ«ke means “deliberate ending of the building of something” and the something, as we know from previous sentences, is the city and tower of Babel.

One more sentence and one more post and we are done with the Babel text.

anhērmi

anheermi

anhērmi

A collective noun designating mortar, defined as a semi-fluidic substance used to hold bricks together, and appearing in the third sentence of the Babel text.

ē teteñ ien hēja ñanna jacālmi jajūti nā
aþ te sāim nīkan jacālmi ñe jakīþi
aþ te sāim nīkan ancēwri ñe anhērmi;