Talking Rock in Kenda Soro 3

Continuing from previously, the next two sentences in Soronen Kidi.

Kidido keŋive, “Zodu diya lidu libanaraza seŋipe?”

kidido
kidi=du
rock=GOAL
keŋive
keŋi=vi
question=OUT
zodu
zo=du
indef=GOAL
diya
di=ya
2SG=CAUS
lidu
li=du
1SG=GOAL
libanaraza
li=bana=ra=za
1SG=foot=GO=PATH
seŋipe
seŋi=pe
warning=FAIL
I asked the rock, “Why did you fail to warn me about my foot’s going?”

In this sentence we have a question with a question word, zodu, a combination of the inanimate singular relative clause pronoun zo= wearing its other hat as a general indefinite pronoun and the goal marker =du. Indefinite zo= is the basis of a number of question words. The noun seŋi ‘warning’ is considered speech, and so we have a speech-emitter ‘you’, an audience ‘me’, and then =za to mark indirect speech, which can be anything from an indirect quotation to the bare subject or topic of the speech. Finally, rather than the usual =vi OUT for speech, we have =pe FAIL, as the speech presumably failed to be emitted.

Kideya rusuve, “Ŋeya piŋividu soronen kidi liŋi.”

kideya
kidi=ya
rock=CAUS
rusuve
rusu=vi
reply=OUT
Å‹eya
Å‹e=ya
SGan=CAUS
piŋividu
piŋi=vi=du
pain=OUT=GOAL
soronen
soro=nen
word=COM
kidi
kidi
rock
liŋi
li=Å‹i
1SG=MOVE
The rock replied, “I am a talking rock who causes pain.”

For the reply, more direct speech. The first phrase is an embedded clause marked by =du. Here =du marks an intent, a metaphorical goal. The noun piŋi ‘pain’ is abstract enough to be emitted. Otherwise sensations, physical and mental, tend to use =me IN or =no COME as their main verb. Using =me or =no here would imply that the rock was feeling pain rather than causing pain.

Note also that the animate singular relative clause pronoun is used here in what is not an actual relative clause. These pronouns are also used for indefinite reference and questions. I go back and forth on whether this should be the first person pronoun instead.